Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'kitbashing'.

Found 12 results

  1. Intro of my project HERE EXTERIOR As I mentioned in my intro, I plan on totally customizing the exterior. I will start by adding a portico style porch over the front door to give the house more depth. Then the whole bottom half of the house will have a stone finish.          Photo 1: I love this house! This house was the initial inspiration behind the stone porch so I plan on replicating it on my Glencroft exactly! I can't wait to see how it will turn out. I also plan on finishing the chimney the same way. Plaster and Stone.  Photo 2: I researched for days until I came across this stone stencil by Bromley Craft. I thought it looked extremely realistic and seems like it would work well with the tudor details around the rest of the house.   Photo 3: Not sure where I saved this from, But this is going to be my reference when painting the stones to look real.  Photo 4: This house is located just a few blocks from me and I love the details of the wood and the plaster.  The textures seem like they will be a lot of fun (or a nightmare) to create in mini.  My plan for this will be to attach all the wood detailing first and then fill in the spaces between the wood with spackle for the plaster.  Ive experimented a few times with this over the weekend using popsicle sticks and so far it seems like it works pretty well. (See below photos) Photo 5: For the main living room window, I decided to make one completely from scratch to compliment the stone facade. I liked these medieval/gothic style window casements and decided this heavy stone look with the diamond leaded glass will look great on that specific window.      Photo 6 & 7: For my wood & plaster exterior experiment/test, I cut and glued down the wood, then when dry....I sanded till smooth and went over it with a awl to scratch in the wood beam grain.  For the plaster I painted the space with wood glue first and before it dried completely, I spread and smoothed the spackle as much as possible into the space. When completely dry, I used a moist rag instead of sandpaper and smoothed the spackle even more while simultaneously cleaning out the spackle from the tiny cracks in the wood.  For my actual build, I plan on pre-finishing the wood trim before adding in the spackle so it doesn't stick AS MUCH to the wood and will be easier to clean off.  The overall finished look seemed a bit more "Rustic" than what I want so we'll see how I refine this process.  My Kit arrives tomorrow so I cant wait to start my Gallery/Blog!    Thanks for reading guys! xx
  2. The Glencroft: Day 4-5

    TGIF! Im am so happy with the progress of my Glencroft!  I started yesterday by gluing some of the remaining facade pieces. The upstairs gables were glued in and I was able to finally make my sub-walls out of foam board for the upstairs! (See pictures below).  Once I finally had the front walls all tacked, I was able to start planning the Stone Portico/Porch that I will be adding to the front.  I plan on making this out of 3/4 plywood to give the walls a heavy stone thickness but at first I wanted to make it out of foam board so I can get an idea how the finished product will look.  Since the new porch addition covers most of the swooping roof line in the front, I was able to remove a small section on roof that comes through the living-room above the front door.  Now, the room is nice and square. You can see in one of the pictures below.   Last night I picked up a few finishing supplies (Stain, varnish and paint) so I can finally start doing some detailing.  I want the wood throughout the house to be a really dark rick color so I plan on mixing a cherry, walnut and a hint of ebony stain to hopefully achieve this.
  3. The Glencroft: Day 2-3

    Happy Thursday! Yesterday ended up being a much more productive day than I had previously anticipated. I picked up a couple sheets of foam board and traced and cut out all my sub-walls!  Since I thought this would take much longer, I ended up having time to finally start gluing the house together!   I ended up gluing almost the entire front facade. The fireplace wall and staircase will be glued in later after I pre-finish the staircase pieces. (Once glued down, this part will be super hard to reach comfortably) The pictures I attached below were all taken this morning and show the glued together rooms with the sub-walls in place to make sure they fit correctly and look right.  You can also see the larger living room and dining room widows. This evening, I plan on starting the paneling in the stairwell area so I can get that segment glued in.  Im also expecting my Heidi Ott wall sconces to arrive today as well as a pack of 1/16 basswood to start my paneling. (CANT WAIT!)  I'll update with more photos tomorrow!  Cheers! Chris
  4. First Days

    So I finally received my kit and couldnt have been more excited. A few hours,  and about 2000 splinters later... I had all my pieces out and labeled. I also received the fireplace mantle that I was going to jimmy into the livingroom wall.  The first thing I wanted to focus on was the initial kit-bashing.  Since I had all the pieced loose and easy to work with, I marked off all my lines and made all the cuts and I can already envision all the finishes!  The major Kit Changes I made were: Livingroom: • Inset a new stone-look fireplace and center on the wall of the living room. (PICTURED) You can still see the opening of the old fireplace...This will be covered with paneling.  • Open up a large centered passage between the livingroom and now dining room (Previously kitchen) (PICTURED) • Bring front window/bay window down to the ground and make window bigger. • Make both windows on the stairway 2 inches taller. (Plan on putting stained glass in these) Dining Room: • Cut doorway into future kitchen addition. (PICTURED) • Make old kitchen window (now dining) taller and wider. (More appropriate for a formal dining space I think.) Upstairs: • Make the bathroom door square (It was a pointed tudor/gothic shape before)  • Make bedroom widow thinner and taller.  • Cover upstairs fireplace and book case....I just glued in the pieces. (Since this area is partially obstructed by the stair banister, I plan on putting a built in linen-closet here) • Making right-side bathroom window smaller.  I think this covers my Day-One progress. I think most of my kit bashing is complete at this point. Now Im just dreading all the new custom window and door frames Im going to have to make from scratch.      
  5. Good Morning!  So Im very excited that all my kit-bashed pieces that I set overnight came out great! The new front facade fits perfect together. You can see in the picture below that the bottom window no longer overhangs but goes down to the ground now. I did this because I will eventually be covering that part of the facade in stone and thought it would look better, plus, it gave me more room to make the window slighly taller from the top and bottom. The livingroom is going to be a jugsaw puzzle of dark stained paneling so I want this room to receive as much natural light as possible. You can also see the upstairs window was moved up about a half inch as well as made taller and more slim. Today I plan on picking up a stack of foam board and tracing/cutingout subwalls for the entire house so I can do the finishing details on those as well as give the walls a more realstic depth.  Just ordered some veneer on ebay (Thanks for the tip @soapz), so I'll be sharing that with you all very soon!  Have a great wednesday everyone!  Chris
  6. Intro of my project HERE DINING ROOM The current kit doesnt have a designated dining room so I got the idea to add a room to the left of the house for the kitchen and turn the existing kitchen into the dining room.           Photo 1: My first step when beginning my build will be to redo the wall between the living room and dining. As of now there is a small door on the right half of the wall and I plan on centering the door and creating a wide tudor styled archway as the one pictured above (Sans the pocket doors) and putting two sconces on either side of the wall. Parallel to this archway will be the new doorway into the kitchen. Possibly a swinging door.  Photo 2 & 3: I plan on continuing the paneling from the living room into the dining except in the dining, I only plan on taking it about 3/4 up the wall as pictured. I also plan on continuing the same crossed beam detail from the living room ceiling in here. Since I won't start this room until the living room is done, I hope to be pretty handy with the paneling at this point. (I hope)   KITCHEN The kitchen as I mentioned will be a while new add on.  Im going to make my like easy and keep the finishes here simple.     Photo 1: I love this old sink and stove. Im still debating if I want to do a checkered floor as pictured or a large slate slab floor which seems more true to the Tudor-ness of the house.  What do you think? Photo 2: Same Idea as the first photo.  Stay Tuned for my next post: Exterior
  7. Intro of my project HERE LIVING ROOM I always loved Tudor architecture. I live here in Los Angeles and there is A LOT of 1920s built Tudor homes that have always caught my eye.  Living in a 1920s building myself, I always loved the finished and details that you just don't see in modern day constructions.  Thus, leading me to focus my finishes and details around the 1920s.         Photo 1: For the living room, I decided nothing would look richer than to do dark stained floor to ceiling paneling. I think to achieve this I plan on creating secondary walls traced from the kit walls out of the same kit style wood. Doing all the finishes and wiring and then gluing the wall into place directly over a kit wall. This is still a theory so stay tuned to see the work in progress. Photo 2: I thought a carved stone fireplace would look great with the wall paneling. Luckily, I found THIS ONE which will be really easy to paint and inset into the existing fireplace cavity.  Photo 3: The provided staircase with the kit is cute and all, but not good enough for this project.  My goal is to make this as to-scale as possible with as much detail as possible so I plan on making the stairs a bit more grand and intricate. I love the look of the heavy balusters and the square newel posts. I think it will be easy to achieve using pre made staircase pieces and just hand making the newel posts out of square dowels and some baseboard moulding trimmed down.  Like I said above.... we'll see how this theory plays out.  Photo 4: Lastly is the ceiling. The first picture has a hint of this finish but the last picture shows what I want in a bit more detail. White plaster ceiling with heavy crossed beams, trimmed with a small crown moulding.  I have a feeling that this is going to be a pain. If anyone has any suggestions on how to do a detailed ceiling like that please share!  Stay Tuned for my next post: Dining Room Inspiration
  8. Exterior work begins...

    From the album 2014 HBS Creatin' Contest--Erabliere Aucoin, Sugar Shack and Shop

    Door, windows, are all scratch-built. Because I had very particular design ideas, and because it's cool to see what I can do without breaking the bank.


 Without breaking the bank much, that is. There are probably cheaper hobbies but I don't want to know about them.
  9. The structures laid out

    From the album 2014 HBS Creatin' Contest--Erabliere Aucoin, Sugar Shack and Shop

    Good grief, this thing is getting huge!


 Well, in our tiny apartment, somehow we don't know any better than to build huge mini projects. Eventually, we'll have to sleep on the windowsills when there's no space left in here.
  10. More bashing...

    From the album 2014 HBS Creatin' Contest--Erabliere Aucoin, Sugar Shack and Shop

    Here I've closed up part of the open roof wall and added a dormer to it, along with bashing a big hole at the very top of the roof to set in a long, vented cupola that sugar shacks, especially in Québec, often have to aid in the evaporation process. All of this bashing significantly changed the strength of the building in various places, resulting in the need for a whole lot of brass rods drilled into the connections to reinforce the remaining wood. 


Ah, well, bash and learn!
  11. Dryfit with shop walls added

    From the album 2014 HBS Creatin' Contest--Erabliere Aucoin, Sugar Shack and Shop

    In this shot you can see that the scratchbuilt shop has a huge opening on the wall which meets up with the Contest kit. In the kit house, the opening was designed to accommodate a garage door but I elected to use the opening to merge the two buildings, as if the shack had once had a solid wall which the Aucoins tore out to attach their shiny new shop and make the entire place hang together as a whole.
  12. From the album 2014 HBS Creatin' Contest--Erabliere Aucoin, Sugar Shack and Shop

    Of course I knew the measurements from before the kit arrived, but this was my first chance to see right in front of me, exactly how much space this multi-part project was going to take up!