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Which glue do you prefer for shingling?

16 posts in this topic

Posted

I am new to this hobby. Actually completing my first house soon. I am shingling and it is going well but I am wondering what glues most of you use to do this. I have been using Tacky Glue. I am thinking quck grab might be better but it is messy and tough to control.

Suggestions appreciated.

Bob

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Posted

Are you putting the glue on the shingles or on the roof? If you run a line of glue along the guideline, it's fairly simple to stick the shingles in it. After a couple of rows, you may want to use masking or painters' tape to hold them in place while the glue dries.

Some folks use hot glue for the shingles. That's the only appropriate use for hot glue, by the way. :D

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Posted

I had close to 4,500 shingles to glue onto my Queen Anne. I used Quick Grip, it grabs instantly although it can get stringy. RGT recommends using Liquid Nails. Have not tried it but might on my Foxhall Manor.

Valerie

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Posted

Hi, Bob, when you get a chance, do introduce yourself to everybody over at the Newcomers' Forum. It depends what I'm using for shingles, as I prefer wood glue for wooden shingles and tacky glue for paper-based shingles. In any case I'm like Kathie, I run thin glue beads along the lines I've drawn on the roof and along the tops of the shingles in the preceding row to lay each succeeding row of shingles. If they start to curl or otherwise don't want to play nicely with the masking tape I throw a sheet of waxed paper over them and clamp scrapwood across the upper rows until they dry nice & flat, although a wee ripple here & there doesn't freak me out, having looked long & hard at RL shingles.

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Posted

haven't gotten to this stage yet but know I would use wood glue.

anyone with birds 'please' do not use liquid nails or any other with fumes. PLEASE. The toxins will kill them. To work with a new glue for me E6000 I am putting a drape over the doorway and duct tape to frame, will open door and windows and have exhaust fan running. That's what we do for their little systems. this new glue is to attach rubber bricks all around foundation.

good luck,

LindaC

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Posted

I'm using Tacky Glue and I love it. Will probably never use white glue on a dollhouse again. I store the bottle on its side so it is always ready to use. Also, you got to keep that nozzle clean. For shingles I mark where the top edge of each row will go and lay a bead of glue, then run glue along the top of the previous row. I love that the glue doesn't drip and that it is thick enough to hold the shingles in place so that I don't have to wait for each row to dry.

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Posted

I have made templates with thick shipping paper and used Quick Grab on a row of shingles I have fitted together with thin masking tape. This way I can have the shingles lay flat while the glue sets.

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Posted

I like Aileen's FastGrab Tacky Glue. Linda's right about using certain glues and paints with birds AND Cats around. Both are extremely sensitive to anything that contains phenols.

Jeanne

Oh yeah..HOWDY! Welcome to the forums.

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Posted

I use hot-melt glue in the winter (when the windows are closed) and solvent based construction adhesive (with a warning about flammibility and ventilation at the bottom of the front label) in the summer when I do my shingling on the porch. Even the low moisture tacky glues (excellent glues!) curl the shingles which doesn't bother me in appearance, but which slows me down because the preceeding row is so easy to knock out of position once the shingles begin to move - they no longer are tight to each other side-to-side and they can be thrown out of line with a touch. So I end up waiting after one row of shingles for the glue to stiffen.

and some burns along the way until you get good at it.

doc

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Posted

I find that running a strip of masking tape along the bottom of each preceding row as I lay the next row keeps things in place, and every four or five rows I clamp a piece of scrapwood over the rows of shingles until they dry.

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Posted

I was always told to never use hot wood glue on a dollhouse, even for shingles. Owner of Bearly Big Enough advised me that she had a customer use the hot glue and with the weather change, her shingles were popping off. Has anyone ever had that problem?

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Posted

This is the Laurel that was built with hot glue before I took it all apart and rebuilt it with regular carpenter's wood glue (NOT hot wood glue!):

gallery_8_1103_130685.jpg

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Posted

I can also tell you to stay away from hot glue. I have purchased two partially built kits while on business trips. In breaking them back down to fit flat in the box one of them practically pulled apart. The other had so much hot glue I used the hotel iron to soften and remove. Bottom line: it gets brittle and will not hold your house or shingles for nearly the length of time that wood glue will hold it.

This is the Garfield foundation before and after I pulled it apart:

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Posted

Oh, well, for that matter, here;s the Pierce I'm rehabbing before disassembling (and before I tried removing paint, windows, etc):

gallery_8_3402_274734.jpg

and after:

gallery_8_3402_31755.jpg

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Posted

I used Aileene's Tacky Glue, the best glue going. :) I used a strip of wood the width of the shingle overlap with a narrower strip glued to the bottom to act as a measure. Fit the strip under the last row of shingles, and you can just run a bead of glue where the shingles will go and slide them into place with no glue showing.

The template makes it easy and insures that the shingle rows are straight.

I aged my cedar shingles in a can of rusty nails and vinegar.

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Posted

ndia ink and isopropyl alcohol does a sweet aging job on wood, too.

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