Painting Before Assembling Basic Unit

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I have seen the suggestion that it's important to put a coat of paint on dollhouse parts, then sand, before assembling. I will be attaching the sides to the base unit, putting in the 2nd and 3rd floors, and then attaching the front. I had planned to use four different colors and some wallpaper, however, for the interior walls. Any suggestions about how to prepare multi-colored interior walls before assembling?

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Where did you see that suggestion?  When to paint depends on the kit parts and how it goes together, and the best way to understand that is to invest in a roll of masking or painter's tape and first assemble the kit using the tape, NOT glue, and look at it and study it and let it begin to speak to you and tell you what it wants and how to do it.  This is what we call the dry fit, and it not only helps you to see what may need painting or decorating before assembly with glue, but what you might prefer to stain instead and what you will be able to wait until the build has begun to attend to.  Dry fitting also helps you to understand the instructions better and whether you will follow them as written to build you house, or whether you may need to change the order of things.  You can also trim your tabs and slots for a more perfect fit during the dry fit.

If the instructions recommend hot glue for assembly, ignore that and invest in a good carpenter's wood glue for the wood parts and a clear drying tacky glue for the acetate inserts.  You will probably want to wait until after you have decorated before installing windows and doors.  You will want to prime any surfaces that you want to paint or paper.  I generally stain and prime after the dry fit, but otherwise decorate as I build.  You find what works for you, there is no hard and fast rule other than to relax, have fun, and if you make a mistake, fix it and move on.

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Priming with a clear sealer or plain white is often recommended. Doing both sides helps reduce warping. It helps to keep the tannins from seeping through and staining your wallpaper or decorative paints later on. Some folks mark where the wood comes together with tape or a pencil line and leave that unpainted to increase the glue adhesion at those joins.

Finish painting, papering, and decorating can be done before, during or after. It largely depends on the layout of the house, how easily you can reach the area to accomplish it and, really, simply personal preference. I do some of each. Working flat as much as possible rather than standing on my head to get into a remote area just makes sense for my old hands and body.

Wood glue is great for the construction phase and tacky glue is good for just about everything else.

Welcome to miniatures. Be careful, they are addictive.

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I'm building a custom house and broke my own personal rule of "build first, then decorate". I had applied the wallpaper before sorting out the roof issues and now I may have to repaper sections. Saw dust, glue and poorly hammered roof nails have messed up my pretty paper. I know I should have applied "sizing" to the paper first, but I forgot this step.

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I'm building a custom house and broke my own personal rule of "build first, then decorate". I had applied the wallpaper before sorting out the roof issues and now I may have to repaper sections. Saw dust, glue and poorly hammered roof nails have messed up my pretty paper. I know I should have applied "sizing" to the paper first, but I forgot this step.

Sable, what is sizing?

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Thanks for all your suggestions. I'm going to do one coat for just the ceiling (all white), sand, assemble, and then finish the interior. I have small hands, and the dry run of the assembly didn't reveal inaccessible areas.

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I should have said "Fixatif", it's a spray sealant for dry artwork (charcoal, chalk, pencil) and was recommended to me for DH wallpaper. It prevents greasy finger smudges. I believe Michaels has it but I think I bought mine at Walmart under the Krylon Brand.

http://painting-crafts.com/krylon-workable-fixatif-11oz-spray-flammable.html

I dont mean to take away from the original post question, Anita, so I apologize, im new at this like you so im a question freak.

Sable, is there a diffrence between the spray sealer and the fixative?

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Sable, is there a diffrence between the spray sealer and the fixative?

I'm not sure but Fixatif is acid free.

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I'm not Sable, but I can answer the sealer/fixative question. A true fixative is lighter weight and, in the artist world, can allow a drawing or pastel to be still be reworked. It doesn't provide the water resistance but does protect - just not as completely.

A sealer is heavier and does just as it's name suggests, it seals the top. Think using polyurethane over your stain to finish it. Just be sure to look for acid free products.

 

It depends on what you want your end result to be. I lean towards the sealers for my home printed wallpapers and scrapbooking papers so I have lots of time to slide the paper into position and lots of time for cleanup of the glue/paste residue without having the colors bleed and the paper tear.

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