Curtain Rods: Where to locate brackets and findings

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Good morning, everyone!

 

I'm finding curtain rods to be quite challenging - I purchase some brass and silver jewelry heavy gauge wire with the tool to straighten the wire, but finding the challenge in what to use for brackets. I have many windows in the house and to purchase the pre-made sets is quite spendy.

 

Anyone have a resource or ideas they are willing to share for the brackets and how to attach so the rod is far enough away from the wall so the curtains can slide?

 

I can do most other things for the house - just drawing a blank in the hardware arena.

 

Thank you so much for whatever assistance you can provide.

 

 

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You want sliding curtains?  You can add wee blocks to the back sides of whatever decorative ends you're putting on your rods.  I used to sweat making wee curtain mounting hardware until I noticed once it was all in place it was indistinguishable from a nicely done curtain drapery set simply glued into place.  The curtains and drapes in the Thorne rooms don't actually slide, either.

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I have used a few different ways to hang my curtains, but my favorite has become the little eye things that are used in jewelry making. Sorry, the name is gone from my brain right this moment, They screw into pendants and the chain or a jump ring can go into them. Ungh! I am sorry the name just won't appear.

Then I usually make curtain rods from things like paperclips and they slide right into the little holes. You just need to be careful you don't screw them all the way through your wall. I start a hole for them where I want them to go (I use a push pin), screw it in a little bit, unscrew it and put a drop of glue (very tiny drop) on the hole and then re-screw the eye in. I hope I explained that ok.

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Metal ones are available from Hobby builder's.(miniatures.com)

 

 

:bear:

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I use jewelry finding as a substitute for lots of different hardware.

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For the last curtains I made, I used metal decorative pushpins I got from a scrapbooking store and a small wooden dowel. I wanted a gold color, so I spray painted the pins and the wood. Then I just pushed the pins in place, placed the dowel rod with the curtain on the pins and then pushed the pins in further. Very inexpensive and simple.

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I haven't made mine yet but I plan to use jump rings, screw eyes, and something decorative for the rod ends.

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I used tiny eyelet screws that I got at Lowe's and used wooden skewers that I cut to fit each window. Just use a push pin or finger drill to put holes where you want the 2 screws to go and then twist them in place. Make your curtains and put them on the wooden skewer and slide it into and through the eyelet screws on either end. It was quite simple to do. I painted all of the skewers to mimic a red chestnut stain plus the curtains are removable should you need to remove them. Take a look at my gallery on my Garfield to take a peek at some of my curtains. Hope this helps you out!!!!!!

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Thank you to everyone for sharing your excellent ideas and Brae for the link to your tutorial and pictures. I definitely have a better game plan now on how to address curtain rods!

 

I'm so glad this forum is available and you are all so helpful sharing your time and ideas!

 

Christie (Phoenix71)

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I used tiny eyelet screws that I got at Lowe's and used wooden skewers that I cut to fit each window. Just use a push pin or finger drill to put holes where you want the 2 screws to go and then twist them in place. Make your curtains and put them on the wooden skewer and slide it into and through the eyelet screws on either end. It was quite simple to do. I painted all of the skewers to mimic a red chestnut stain plus the curtains are removable should you need to remove them. Take a look at my gallery on my Garfield to take a peek at some of my curtains. Hope this helps you out!!!!!!

That's my go-to, too.

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I haven't gotten to the point of actually trying this yet, but I have these brackets glued onto wood strips to make one side thicker (to bring them out in front of the window trim), then I'll put one on each side of every window with a shelf on top, and will use skewers through the holes in the design as curtain rods. So they will be similar to this:
put-a-shelf-over-a-window-and-use-the-sh

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Me too! Love that you get a pretty little display shelf out of it too.

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Thanks! I was agonizing over how to do it (never mind that the house shell wasn't even together at the time) and finally came up with that. I'm looking forward to seeing it done. :)

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I have one window finished,and the rest are glued and ready to go on once the wallcoverings are on. Tiny dowels will slide through the holes and I just need to find the right beads for the finials.

 

th_20150404_222427_zpszwe5ls2k.jpg

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Wonderfully done. I love the concept for RL too.

Could be done in a ultra modern style too with chrome and glass.

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Thanks, Selkie.

 

I like your idea of glass and metal for a modern look.

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Oo, I like that!  Did you make your fixture from basswood?

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Yes, just a plank of basswood. If I had it to do over again, I'd glue the brackets on the front of the window frame and then paint. These frames had been painted before I remembered my plan for the brackets/shelves.

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