Chrysnbon Kit

37 posts in this topic

You're very welcome!

 

Also, leave the wee tiny parts that you'll be painting on the trees, then cut them off when you're ready to glue them on.

I learned this the hard way.  This is one of the best pieces of advice you can get if you are new to Chrysnbon kits!!!

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I'm sort of partial to the nail boards they make for acrylic nails.

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You said it Jessie! Especially when you are painting toothbrushes!  :laughbounce:

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I thought of one other tip! I always wash the pieces in some warm water and dish soap before I glue anything, or after a lot of sanding. The model airplane kits always recommend to do that, because there may be some residue of mold release or whatever they use in the manufacturing, that could interfere with glue and paint.  

 

When you're painting the tiny pieces still attached to the tree/sprue, you can use a clothespin to hold it, also to give you something to prop it up as it dries.

 

That's good to know about the curio cabinet. I have one and I'm planning to paint it, but I don't see any way to assemble it first, then paint. Or maybe partially assemble, paint, then add the doors and glass?

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I thought of one other tip! I always wash the pieces in some warm water and dish soap before I glue anything, or after a lot of sanding. The model airplane kits always recommend to do that, because there may be some residue of mold release or whatever they use in the manufacturing, that could interfere with glue and paint.  

 

When you're painting the tiny pieces still attached to the tree/sprue, you can use a clothespin to hold it, also to give you something to prop it up as it dries.

 

That's good to know about the curio cabinet. I have one and I'm planning to paint it, but I don't see any way to assemble it first, then paint. Or maybe partially assemble, paint, then add the doors and glass?

Thanks for the tip!

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I built a chair from the drop leaf table set. I washed the pieces in warm soapy water and towel dried them. I cleaned up the rough edges, but didn't paint the parts before assembly. (I really wanted to see if I could work with the glue and small pieces.) I used the Testors non toxic glue because I am sensitive to chemical smells and wanted to work indoors. I had no problems assembling the chair and the glue seems to have worked well. So, I'll experiment with paint on the chair tomorrow and then build the rest of the set.

Thank you all again so much for your tips and advice! I hope someday I'm able to help others as you have helped me.

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Hooray!!! Show us pictures when it's done!

 

I have the drop leaf table kit, too, but haven't assembled it. It looks like it's not a functioning drop leaf, right? You either have to glue it upright or dropped, but you can't have it both ways?

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Hooray!!! Show us pictures when it's done!

 

I have the drop leaf table kit, too, but haven't assembled it. It looks like it's not a functioning drop leaf, right? You either have to glue it upright or dropped, but you can't have it both ways?

If you instll hinges and braces you could make it functioning.

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Hooray!!! Show us pictures when it's done!

 

I have the drop leaf table kit, too, but haven't assembled it. It looks like it's not a functioning drop leaf, right? You either have to glue it upright or dropped, but you can't have it both ways?

The bottom of the table has slots with braces. It looks like the braces could slide in the slots if you could figure out how to add working hinges. But, I'll just glue mine in place

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The bottom of the table has slots with braces. It looks like the braces could slide in the slots if you could figure out how to add working hinges. But, I'll just glue mine in place

That's one situation where I would use the weensy brass hinges, glue them on with E6000.

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I thought of one other tip! I always wash the pieces in some warm water and dish soap before I glue anything, or after a lot of sanding. The model airplane kits always recommend to do that, because there may be some residue of mold release or whatever they use in the manufacturing, that could interfere with glue and paint.  

 

 

As a kid I built a LOT of car, plane and ship models. I learned at a young age to do this (after some trial and error). I used some high grit sandpaper to sand off the excess paint and in some cases any part of the tree that I couldn't get with my hobby knife. It is amazing how well these techniques work. The key thing to remember is the same with any component build -- patience. "Speed kills" as they say.

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As a kid I built a LOT of car, plane and ship models. I learned at a young age to do this (after some trial and error). I used some high grit sandpaper to sand off the excess paint and in some cases any part of the tree that I couldn't get with my hobby knife. It is amazing how well these techniques work. The key thing to remember is the same with any component build -- patience. "Speed kills" as they say.

Thank you, Greg!

I also want to note for others who read this topic that the Testors non toxic glue worked well. The pieces are very sturdy after they dry.

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