Tools that everyone should have for dollhouses?

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My Glencroft kit is coming tomorrow and I'm trying to setup my hobby room with tools and necessities that I know I will need.  So far, I have x-taco knives, rulers (straight and 90 degrees), miter block for sawing, masking and painters tape, pencils, paint brushes, needle nose pliers, sanding pads and clamps.  Is there anything else that I may need?  Plan on going to Lowes tomorrow for some paint/stains and whatever else I may need.

Thanks everyone.

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Spackling, putty knife and a chisel (for gluing errors).  :D  I also have a utility knife.  Sometimes you need something heavier duty than an X-Acto.

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Glue & a roll of paper towels (to wipe up the glue that may ooze out when you join two pieces of wood together.  Congrats on the Glencroft!  I'm going to be starting one soon too!

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GLENCROFT!!! I just got the kit for Christmas, so I'm excited to see how others progress. Good luck, and I'll be cheering for you!

One of the tools that I have used all year for all sorts of things is a clay sculpting tool. I have no idea what it's called, it's not a pallet knife. One end is thin and pointy, the other end curved. Think of it like a mini-sized putty knife. Good for getting a wee bit of putty where you need it, or scraping it out of where you don't.

I also used an old coffee mug to hold the upside down glue bottle.    

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37 minutes ago, otterine said:

Spackling, putty knife and a chisel (for gluing errors).  :D  I also have a utility knife.  Sometimes you need something heavier duty than an X-Acto.

 

20 minutes ago, Lisa_F said:

Glue & a roll of paper towels (to wipe up the glue that may ooze out when you join two pieces of wood together.  Congrats on the Glencroft!  I'm going to be starting one soon too!

Thanks for the suggestions.  I added spackle, wood filler, putty knife, utility knife and chisel to my list.  Forgot to mention I had glue (Aleene's) and paper towels.  I have a Dremel too just in case and a mini saw. 

 

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20 minutes ago, stickyfingers said:

GLENCROFT!!! I just got the kit for Christmas, so I'm excited to see how others progress. Good luck, and I'll be cheering for you!

One of the tools that I have used all year for all sorts of things is a clay sculpting tool. I have no idea what it's called, it's not a pallet knife. One end is thin and pointy, the other end curved. Think of it like a mini-sized putty knife. Good for getting a wee bit of putty where you need it, or scraping it out of where you don't.

I also used an old coffee mug to hold the upside down glue bottle.    

Very cool about the Glencroft!!!  I'll be cheering for you too!!  I expect to spend day one just sorting through the pieces and trying to organize it. 

Great idea about the mug.  Need to get a holder for my brushes too.  I'll keep my eye out for that clay tool.

Edited by bigstormgirl

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Save your money for the Glencroft! You can use any clean, empty can (tomato sauce, coffee, etc.) to hold tools. If you want it to be pretty, cover it with a strip of pretty paper or Contact paper, or go to your local thrift and look for cheap interesting containers.  I keep a bazillion popsicle sticks in an old lidded coffee can. I just added contact paper to the outside to make it go with my craft room. I use those craft sticks for all sorts of things...smearing glue, as small bits of trim wood, to stir sample pots of paint with, so I buy them in bulk. I just googled the tool, it's called a "clay clean out tool."  

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Great minds think a like!  I'll be using an old spaghetti sauce jar for my brushes.  Don't need anything fancy.  Good idea about craft sticks.  I really need those!

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Masking or painters' tape 2" wide for the dry fit.

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A Dremel is a rotating tool with bits that you can use for grinding, sanding, polishing, etching....I have two and rarely ever use them. The sanding disks can put an eye out or cut you if (actually when) they shatter. You must wear goggles when using one of these. 

 

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I have a Dremel 2000 mounted in a stand to use as a drill press, and another one I can mount in my router stand.  I also have the flexshaft I use with the former with  sanding drum to sand fiddly bits.  For smaller, localized drilling or sanding I use my Dremel Stylus and for cutting door and window openings to bash kits I love my Dremel Trio; but none of these are necessary for kit construction.

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I bought a 3-pack of those cheap thin "cutting mats" found in the housewares section of Walmart. They're thin plastic sheets meant to be used in place of a cutting board. I use them to protect my work table when I'm painting/staining/gluing lots of little bits of wood. Nothing sticks to them, and you can wipe off the mess with any all-purpose cleaner or a baby wipe. You can use wax paper or parchment paper instead, but I like that I can reuse the mats over and over. An Xacto or utility blade will cut through them, though.   

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One more...a notebook with pockets. I use the pronged folders meant for school work. I keep the kit instructions in the front pocket, notebook paper in the middle and paint chips in the back. I use all of the blank pages to keep to-do lists, notes from any dry fitting, room measurements, shopping lists, sketch out ideas, etc.  

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Thank you everyone.  Great suggestions!  My Dremel will only be used when absolutely necessary.  I hope I won't need it.  Darn thing makes me nervous! lol

The notebook is a great idea!  Nothing worst than and paper and stuff scattered all over your wood pieces.  Been through that before!

And now I wait for the Glencroft.  Hurry up FedEx!!!

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I LOVE waxed paper.  I keep a piece in the bottom of my gluing jig and a roll on my workbench.  I also have a self-healing cutting mat I found in the quilting section of one of the big box craft stores.

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BABY WIPES!!  I keep 2 or 3  packs around...I cannot stand icky fingers while Im working....

wax paper is also good for keeping surfaces clean and is easy clean up...sandwich or gallon size baggies for parts...dont forget to label each as you put them in the bags...

good luck...I loved building the Glencroft...its a great house with nice size rooms!

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Great ideas with the wax paper and baby wipes! 

Got the Glencroft and got the first floor, right wall and back foundation glued and letting it set overnight.  When I opened the box and checked everything, I think I got a surprise from Greenleaf.  It has a magnet in the back, and looks like you can put a small picture in it.  Did anyone else get one?

 

IMG_0364.JPG

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I think they put one in every kit. I have no idea why, other than maybe you're supposed to photograph your dollhouse and hang the pic on the fridge. I wonder if anyone knows?

Congrats on the progress!

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I keep a large roll of freezer paper in my work area.  It's a little tougher than wax paper and comes in a bigger roll. I put that down on my work area before I start, then if I drop a paint brush, or do some sanding - whatever - it's easy to clean up and keeps my workbench from becoming permanently ugly.  I also use it when I'm working on my kitchen counter - which I do when making craft items for bazaars.  I really don't want to mess up the counter!  If I haven't messed up the freezer paper too badly, I just roll it up and use it again. 

I bought a "self-healing mat" from MicroMark many years ago - best investment ever!  I've had mine almost 20 years and use it regularly.  self healing mat

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Toothpicks-- pointy ones. I use these all the time, for getting small amounts of glue where I want it or various other things. Also, scraps of clean dry cloth, like old t-shirts, for wiping up glue.

I use my Dremel, with sanding sleeve, all the time-- great for taking off extra.

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On 12/31/2015, 8:52:25, stickyfingers said:

I think they put one in every kit. I have no idea why, other than maybe you're supposed to photograph your dollhouse and hang the pic on the fridge. I wonder if anyone knows?

Congrats on the progress!

Nope, not in every kit, I didn't get one in either of the kits I bought from them, but they sure are pretty!

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