Painting

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When painting the outside can someone tell me how they hide the notches 

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27 minutes ago, debbru said:

When painting the outside can someone tell me how they hide the notches 

If you're not going to use siding or plaster the walls with spackle (or joint compound, or wall mud), you can at least use spackle to fill the slot spaces after you have sanded the tabs flat, and when the filler is dry, sand that smooth as well; then you're ready to prime and paint.

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To hide horizontal notches (floor/ceiling) I've seen a piece of stripwood run across the wall. When painted, it blends into the wall and looks like an architectural component.

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Thank you for your reply, I was talking about the outside of the house

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54 minutes ago, debbru said:

Thank you for your reply, I was talking about the outside of the house

Holly and I are both talking about the outside of the house. The methods we describe are for covering the little areas where the tabs from the ceiling/floor pieces fit into the slots in the walls. Where walls are notched at corners, Holly's Spackle/joint compound/wallboard mud system also works. Some people also put corner molding on the corners to cover those irregularities.

If this isn't what you mean, can you please explain or show a photo?

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1 hour ago, KathieB said:

Holly and I are both talking about the outside of the house. The methods we describe are for covering the little areas where the tabs from the ceiling/floor pieces fit into the slots in the walls. Where walls are notched at corners, Holly's Spackle/joint compound/wallboard mud system also works. Some people also put corner molding on the corners to cover those irregularities.

If this isn't what you mean, can you please explain or show a photo?

Covering with spackle as a plaster or stucco treatment:

right side out interior 2.JPG

with corner molding:

P3150056 (2).JPG

and with siding:

South Georgia house.jpg

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You are great teachers.  Thanks for being so thorough, it helped me too,

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4 hours ago, mesp2k said:

583b057f9d0d6_finishtabs.jpg.f531027d27e

3d-thumb-up.gif

 

 

Thank you for your help 

4 hours ago, mesp2k said:

583b057f9d0d6_finishtabs.jpg.f531027d27e

3d-thumb-up.gif

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, mesp2k said:

583b057f9d0d6_finishtabs.jpg.f531027d27e

3d-thumb-up.gif

 

 

It is just too cool how you can do this mockup. The wood even looks like Greenleaf's veneer. Thanks for taking the time to create this. 

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This is awesome. If you make more tutorial pictures like this you should link them all together somewhere so we can find them! 

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Since I used clapboard siding it was easy to cover any notches but all of the suggestions above are excellent.

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On November 27, 2016 at 12:08:56 AM, havanaholly said:

If you're not going to use siding or plaster the walls with spackle (or joint compound, or wall mud), you can at least use spackle to fill the slot spaces after you have sanded the tabs flat, and when the filler is dry, sand that smooth as well; then you're ready to prime and paint.

I really like the elmers wood filler from Home Depot.

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Some people have great success using wood filler, and others, like me, don't.  Find out what works best for you and use that.

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