Window fogging/dirty treatment

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Yes, I know that is an odd title for the thread, it was the first thing that came to mind tho! :wub:

I will be putting the "glass" in my Tennyson windows soon and wanted some tips on how to dirty the glass, or cause fogging. You know, like making the corners worse...a long neglected look. I was thinking about trying rubbing alcohol on the clear plastic stuff that comes with the kits...do you think this would work? I guess i could experiment. Any tips would be appreciated!

I want to have at least one broken window in this house as well! I think I know the general idea of how to do that...

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Well this sounds like it's comin' right along! :wub:

I used dirty water (just a dab of grey paint in a cup of water) to fog my haunt's windows -- dabbed it on with a paper towel and let it dry. I think a dab of white paint would have worked too. Never tried alcohol so I'll pass on whether that would work.

The haunted windows for my kit (Duracraft) were screened with 'breaks', but basically they could be done with a black magic marker or paint -- just drawn in -- and they were foggy, not clear. I used the regular windows for the house, in the basement the haunted windows which had black eyes peeking out of the foggy window and that's pretty effective if you wanted to do something like that.

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Thanks Charlene! I just looked at your haunted house, it looks great!

btw....i love the prancing pony!!!!!!!! awesome job!

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<blush> thanks for kinds words, Marg :banana: ...but I'm really looking forward to your complete of the haunted Tennyson -- that's gonna be a work of art for sure :wub:

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Marg, try "washing" the windows with a 50-50 mix of white glue & water & wipe it off with a cotton ball. You could grate up a bit of black chalk pastel and smear it over the dried glue wash (do try this on a scrap of the acetate to see if it's what you want). If you look at the edges of real broken glass I don't think you want to use black marker, I think using a razor blade to cut your "break" and then washing it with diluted white (or buish-white) paint just along the edges would look more "real" (jmho).

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, I think using a razor blade to cut your "break" and then washing it with diluted white (or buish-white) paint just along the edges would look more "real" (jmho).

Do I follow correctly -- it's a scratch on the window rather than a cut all the way thru, right? Like making diamond-paned windows?

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The glue for plastic (I think it's Uhu, it's in a squeeze tube) makes clear plastic foggy - don't know if that could work for you.

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I have never heard of that glue. I guess i'll have to experiment with the different ideas and see what will acheive the look i'm going for.

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it's a scratch on the window rather than a cut all the way thru, right? Like making diamond-paned windows?

Marg could do that, too, if she wants, but to simulate the broken glass with pieces still in the frame she'll need to cut through the plastic to remove some pieces. Look at real broken windows to see how they ought to look.

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This has been an interesting thread. Learning new techniques. I probably would have buried the windows under a thin layer of dirt and had one of the kids jump on them to scratch them up and make the dirty. :lol:

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