Shingling a Gazebo or Tower

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I was awake half the night, trying to figure out how to shingle the gazebo roof.  Are there any tips out there I should know.  Thanks 

 

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Maybe just look at some google images and see how others have done it. I don't  do wood shingles very often but I just cut the ones on the edges on a slant. Like work each section separately if that makes sense. 

 

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1 hour ago, Beulah said:

I was awake half the night, trying to figure out how to shingle the gazebo roof.  Are there any tips out there I should know.  Thanks 

You might consider making lightweight cardboard templates for each of the sections. Mark them with the rows so all are even and glue the shingles to the templates,You can use scissors or a utility knife to trim the overhanging bits of shingles, then glue the templates to the roof.  The joints can be covered with slivers of shingles to close the gap between sections.

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It depends on if you will be using ridge caps over the peaks or butting them up against each other. Ridge caps cover all sins. Butting them requires each shingle to be custom double mitered so that they align perfectly with its neighboring gable. 

If you are not using a cap, Place a toothpick at the top of the apex. Tie threads around it and bring them down each edge and attach them to the bottom of the roof. The threads should be at the same height as the shingles, just touching the top of each shingle.  This will be your guide line.   Cut each tile to match the angle of the fixed guide line. Then double mitre it by cutting away or sanding the underside of the shingle at an angle. Each row should be done going all the way around the roof. 

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Thanks ladies.  I googled here and Weeza did a Garthfield that gave me help seeing it. I think I may do the templates Kathie.  Sable, you have me lost lol :dunno:. I'm not that smart lol.  Though I am sure it would be perfect.  

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Sorry I was so detailed and confusing. I’m not a huge fan of templates when it comes to something which requires so many custom cuts. Make sure you allow for the thickness  of the template. To play it safe, make the templates a tad wider.

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I split leftover shingles vertically and glue them over the "seams", lapping them to match the rows on each section.  Mine aren't wonderful:

the finished interior:  the attic bedroom

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I used black sandpaper for the roof of my Pierce.  Turned out very well.  I cut strips instead of individual shingles.  Because it's more bendable, I found the sandpaper much easier to use than the wooden shingles, especially when putting in tricky places.  I also used baking paper (tracing paper same thing) which I folded into the shape of the part of the roof I was shingling.  Obviously depends upon the look your going for, but I'll use this technique and sandpaper again. 

Optimized-Pierce Outside to op.jpg

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Rebecca, what house is that? It's really pretty, and you did an amazing job on the shingles.

 

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8 hours ago, stickyfingers said:

Rebecca, what house is that? It's really pretty, and you did an amazing job on the shingles.

 

Thanks Linda!  Took me forever and dulled a few blades in the process but I'm happy with it.  I'm now stuck and the house has gone into the 'too hard' basket because I'm up to the outside.  I had been planning all along to use weatherboard to clad but as I followed the Greenleaf instructions and stuck the majority of the window frames etc on fairly early in the process, I don't think I can now clad cleanly around the curves.  So now I'm considering my options: rock, stucco, shingles or just paint.  :dunno:

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I like your stone tower very much. I'm not much of a Pierce fan but I really do like it with the tower stoned.. great idea! 

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1 hour ago, Shareb said:

...I don't think I can now clad cleanly around the curves.  So now I'm considering my options: rock, stucco, shingles or just paint.  :dunno:

You can make paper templates of the curved tops and use them to cut your siding.

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Stucco would be lovely! And probably faster and easier than all of the other choices. Is that a lattice foundation? If not, I'd do stucco for the body and the same stonework you've done on the tower for the foundation. Really pretty house! 

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Stucco will fill the lots nicely. Before it was destroyed in the last move I was going to stucco the exterior first two floors of my  Pierce rehab and use shingles on the third floor gables, sort of like I did on the second floor of my Magnolia:

KathieB's photos:  Mafggie's front

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18 hours ago, stickyfingers said:

Stucco would be lovely! And probably faster and easier than all of the other choices. Is that a lattice foundation? If not, I'd do stucco for the body and the same stonework you've done on the tower for the foundation. Really pretty house! 

Thanks Linda!  Good idea to do the stonework around the base.  I broke a few pieces when trying to punch it out at the beginning of this journey so I had figured I'd have to tidy up the base somehow!  I did all the enjoyable inside stuff first so that is pretty much complete except for the odd tidy up bit.  Now to figure how to stucco!

 

Lovely house Holly!  Love how you've done the base...not your average stone huh!

 

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6 hours ago, Shareb said:

...Lovely house Holly!  Love how you've done the base...not your average stone huh!

That's a Florida Cracker family's house, so the foundation (and the chimneybreast inside) is seashell tabby, which is quite authentic, as is the board & batten exterior, the shingled second floor, the corrugated tin roof and the beadboard interior walls.

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21 hours ago, havanaholly said:

That's a Florida Cracker family's house, so the foundation (and the chimneybreast inside) is seashell tabby, which is quite authentic, as is the board & batten exterior, the shingled second floor, the corrugated tin roof and the beadboard interior walls.

Love the foundation and love the idea of the board and batten!!  Never seen anything like it!

 

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On one of the Florida Trail Association hikes in the Apalachicola Notional Forest we ended up at an abandoned Cracker homestead site.

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On 11/24/2017, 9:41:22, KathieB said:

You might consider making lightweight cardboard templates for each of the sections. Mark them with the rows so all are even and glue the shingles to the templates,You can use scissors or a utility knife to trim the overhanging bits of shingles, then glue the templates to the roof.  The joints can be covered with slivers of shingles to close the gap between sections.

that's what I did, with brown paper. Worked great! First two photos aren't the actual tower roof pieces but similar.  I just laid brown paper on the roof, and creased it in corners on edge, cut and fit then cut more if needed to be exact fit of the roof,  then I drew lines on them, and as I glued down the shingles, when I got to those extreme angles, if I could sometimes I would use 1/2 a shingle (split vertically)  to save on shingles because I could use the other piece on the other side.  To cover the creases on the roof after gluing the shingled panels on, I glued on fabric trim then painted.   oh I used scissors to trim after each piece was done, just some good heavy utility scissors or you could use an exacto but I found the scissors faster.  As you can see in the photos some edges have not been trimmed yet.  I found this technique to be really good. and was able to keep things even.  be sure your first row at the bottom over laps that edge good enough to hide the room edge and it will look more professional.

 

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Turned out beautifully. Well done! :clap: 

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Wow Cheryl, It looks amazing.  I would never thought to use fabric to cover the edges, great idea

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I never thought to cover those roof "seams" with soutache; that is BRILLIANT!!!

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5 hours ago, Beulah said:

Cheryl, It looks amazing.  I would never thought to use fabric to cover the edges, great idea

Thanks Joanne! I was happy how it turned out. I would like to do a small house kit in scrapbook card stock, just for the fun, but not sure WHEN.. LOL

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