Frustrated, In Dire Need of Workaround

15 posts in this topic

 

Good afternoon to everyone. I am in dire need of a workaround for 3 identical items of my present dollhouse. For years I have modeled scaled fishing schooners from scratch and thought I was patient and precise. They were nothing compared to the furnishings of the 1:24(?) dollhouse kit I now have in process. Here is my dilemma: The attachment shows a table lamp and shade (qty. 3) to be constructed. The lamp body has 2 fine wires running through the beads for the LED. It takes forever to get the body reasonably straight once assembled but then I cannot find a glue that will keep it straight or fasten the individual pieces together in a rigid manner. The second problem is the material for the shade is rather course and unravels when cut and is not something that I can be proud of. The entire assembly is 3.3 CM in height with the shade being 1.2 CM (large opening) in diameter.

 

 

I have seven glues in my shop (G-S Hypo Cement, white glue, Tacky glue, Loctite Super Glue, Tilebond Wood glue,  Tombow mono liquid glue) and none of them have worked for me. Frustrated is an understatement so I am requesting a workaround idea or advice on how I might make the existing assembly work. Any advice at all, good or bad will be welcomed.:dunce::dunce:

 

DeskLamp.jpg

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49 minutes ago, Ricocha said:

... The lamp body has 2 fine wires running through the beads for the LED. It takes forever to get the body reasonably straight once assembled but then I cannot find a glue that will keep it straight or fasten the individual pieces together in a rigid manner.  ... I have seven glues in my shop (G-S Hypo Cement, white glue, Tacky glue, Loctite Super Glue, Tilebond Wood glue,  Tombow mono liquid glue) and none of them have worked for me....

I would suggest E-6000, which is used for jewelry construction. Apply it  sparingly with a toothpick and clamp it while the glue cures (overnight is best). You might try clamping by wrapping with waxed paper and applying masking or painter's tape over it to hold. The waxed paper can be peeled off whatever glue might ooze.

The second problem is the material for the shade is rather course and unravels when cut and is not something that I can be proud of. The entire assembly is 3.3 CM in height with the shade being 1.2 CM (large opening) in diameter.

You might try painting the back of the shade material with diluted white glue. Don't soak it, just coat it. Let it dry thoroughly before cutting. That should cure the unraveling.

 

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I second Kathie on the E6000.  There are also fabric glues that dry clear that you could use to paint the back of your lampshade fabric before cutting it out.

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I like both suggestions and will give them a try. Which E6000 do you recommend. The craft adhesive or the jewelry and bead adhesive? The craft adhesive I can have here by Monday through Amazon Prime. The bead adhesive will take longer since it is not through Prime.

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I buy E6000 at Wal Mart, the stuff in the gray tube.

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Also you could try gluing just one bead at a time, waiting til each one dries. And you could just cover the shade in a nice paper too. Hope the lights work out!

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The lights are a feature of my kit. There are 12 outside and inside lights. I have a sound board installed and as you walk up to the unit and clap your hands, all 12 lights light up. Clap your hands again and they turn off. I also have an off/on switch installed preventing random sounds from turning on the lights.

 

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When I made the beer taps made with metal jewelry and beads for the bar, I used Krazy Glue and patience. I laid it in a channel moulding for few hours til it was completely dry. However, I was able to poke the jewelry into the bead’s holes for better support.

http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=gallery&module=gallery&controller=view&id=132830&browse=1

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The clapping feature sounds very cool! I agree on the E6000 glue. Also, I have used museum wax, the stuff that holds things where you want them but isn't permanent, to hold pieces straight while the tacky glue dries. You just need a tiny dab of it, and a drop of glue next to it, and your little pieces are held where you want them while the glue dries. Good luck! I'm about to embark on my first 1:24 project and will find out what if any patience I have left :|

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19 hours ago, abloom said:

.... I'm about to embark on my first 1:24 project and will find out what if any patience I have left :|

1:24 is addicting! Just sayin'! :ohyeah:

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Shannonc60: Your idea of making paper lamp shades saved my day and probably my dollhouse. I was becoming frustrated with the kit material and instructions. After reading your reply post, I went out on the Internet and found several (what I thought) were ideal lampshade patterns, then printed them out on 32 lb matte Premium Presentation paper and I am "tickled pink" with the outcome. Thank you so much. This forum is the greatest thing for modelers since sliced bread.

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Rice paper and vellum also make nice lampshades.

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Holly, unfortunately the vellum that I use for my pencil art is 90 and 100 lb. Bristol Board and that will not work. I'll look into the lighter weight Vellum and rice paper at my art store and perhaps give those two papers a try. Thanks, much for the tip.

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Actually the vellum you buy at the grocery store is probably a better weight for 1:12 lampshades (and probably cheaper, too).

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4 minutes ago, havanaholly said:

Actually the vellum you buy at the grocery store is probably a better weight for 1:12 lampshades (and probably cheaper, too).

You're talking about parchment paper from the baking aisle, right?

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