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Anyone built Grosvenor Hall

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Hi, I am presently building Grosvenor Hall. kit. Has anyone built this one?  The main house has 12 rooms then you can buy the basement which has another  5 rooms including the kitchen and  which I have not got yet so am just working on the main part of the house, but because it is my first ever dollhouse build I have made some bad mistakes, like going ahead with gluing it together before applying any internal finishes wallpaper and moulding for starters,  so now have to add these things in a very tight space. I am certainly learning the hard way though, but still loving it all.

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Berenice, for future reference, invest in rolls of painters' or masking tape and assemble the shell of your house before you commit to glue.  Not only will it make things easier to decorate those tight spots, but I discovered that the kit began to speak to me and told me what it wanted.

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Berenice, I am currently working on the Grosvenor Hall with basement kit however I am modifying the design so that there are only five rooms in the main structure.  I decided to make it more like the Pistner House a display type setting for my miniatures. There was a blog a few years ago by miniaturemanorbyvivian.blogspot.com and she did a wonderful job in decorating a Grosvenor house.

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You can always make templates of floors, ceilings and walls.  I use cardstock or index cards to do this.  It is harder once put together but templates always help me.  Hope this helps.

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On ‎3‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎6‎:‎04‎:‎08‎, havanaholly said:

Berenice, for future reference, invest in rolls of painters' or masking tape and assemble the shell of your house before you commit to glue.  Not only will it make things easier to decorate those tight spots, but I discovered that the kit began to speak to me and told me what it wanted.

Thanks Holly,

Yes I have now realised this BIG error!!!

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On ‎3‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎05‎:‎38‎, zelda said:

Berenice, I am currently working on the Grosvenor Hall with basement kit however I am modifying the design so that there are only five rooms in the main structure.  I decided to make it more like the Pistner House a display type setting for my miniatures. There was a blog a few years ago by miniaturemanorbyvivian.blogspot.com and she did a wonderful job in decorating a Grosvenor house.

Hi Zelda, Good to hear about Grosvenor Hall. Yes I intend  to get the basement in due course. That was so interesting about the old blog by miniaturemanorbyvivian.blogspot.com. I might try and find it as it would be so great to see how the decoration was done and very helpful too. Wish me luck. Thank you very much.

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On ‎3‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎39‎:‎11‎, Mini maniac said:

You can always make templates of floors, ceilings and walls.  I use cardstock or index cards to do this.  It is harder once put together but templates always help me.  Hope this helps.

Hi Terry, Yes I thought of that also. Never done it before/ Do you then just stick them in when you have decorated them? Thanks for the info.

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On ‎8‎/‎5‎/‎2018‎ ‎3‎:‎34‎:‎09‎, Beesy said:

Hi Terry, Yes I thought of that also. Never done it before/ Do you then just stick them in when you have decorated them? Thanks for the info.

yes, once I am satisfied and I make sure it fits perfectly.  I then glue it in using modge podge matt.  For hard to reach areas or areas that are oddly shaped, I will use index cards and cut and tape until I have a good template then I will trace the template on my wallpaper or flooring.  It really helps.

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That is a beautiful home! Its a shame that there is not much out there on it. I would love to see more pics of it.

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On ‎5‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎5‎:‎34‎:‎09‎, Beesy said:

Hi Terry, Yes I thought of that also. Never done it before/ Do you then just stick them in when you have decorated them? Thanks for the info.

Hi Terry, Just wanting some more information about templates as have never heard of them up to now as a real novice. What is cardstock, and wold it be strong enough to hold a lot of decorations? I am wanting to apply things like timber moulds and in some areas wallpaper inside these timber also, and things like that. Would thin timber be better to use? I need to learn a lot more about templates as I can see the big benefit of using them for all the walls and even the ceiling which would have to hold plaster casts and heavy things like that. Any information on templates would be very helpful especially since I have already glued all the frame together already (but will not do that again) if I ever build another one !!

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On ‎3‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎05‎:‎38‎, zelda said:

Berenice, I am currently working on the Grosvenor Hall with basement kit however I am modifying the design so that there are only five rooms in the main structure.  I decided to make it more like the Pistner House a display type setting for my miniatures. There was a blog a few years ago by miniaturemanorbyvivian.blogspot.com and she did a wonderful job in decorating a Grosvenor house.

Zelda, have you already built Grosvenor Hall? I am asking this as you are working on the basement. Have you done the whole house too?

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On ‎9‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎3‎:‎09‎:‎40‎, MLPMagic13 said:

That is a beautiful home! Its a shame that there is not much out there on it. I would love to see more pics of it.

Hi Clove, yes it is lovely house. When I get further on with it I will find out how to post the pictures of my work for you to see but will be a while,  as I am very much a learner  at this stage and learning as I go but find all these comments so very helpful. It is marvellous really. I am decorating it in the Georgian era which was very elaborate with lots of moulding on the walls and ceilings and with  fancy plaster work on ceilings, over doors and fireplaces and on walls,  so very decorative and I hope I can do it justice.

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2 hours ago, Beesy said:

Hi Terry, Just wanting some more information about templates as have never heard of them up to now as a real novice. What is cardstock, and wold it be strong enough to hold a lot of decorations? I am wanting to apply things like timber moulds and in some areas wallpaper inside these timber also, and things like that. Would thin timber be better to use? I need to learn a lot more about templates as I can see the big benefit of using them for all the walls and even the ceiling which would have to hold plaster casts and heavy things like that. Any information on templates would be very helpful especially since I have already glued all the frame together already (but will not do that again) if I ever build another one !!

Templates can be made from thin cardboard--think file folders. I suppose just about anything can be glued on them. They can be attached to the wall with double-stick tape if you want them to be removable to get to wiring or for redecorating. They can also be glued to the wall. 

They might be a bit more problematic used on a ceiling. Gravity is not your friend. If you are painting the ceilings, glue the plaster embellishments to the painted surface with something like E-6000 jeweler's glue. If you are papering the ceiling, adhere the paper and let dry thoroughly, then use the E-6000 to glue on the plaster bits. E-6000 is not water soluble, so it will not soak into the paper and loosen the wallpaper paste or other water-based adhesives.

Use tissue paper or printer paper to make patterns for the templates, then use the pattern to cut the card stock to size. Be sure to mark which side of the pattern/template goes against the wall. It's easy to accidentally reverse the piece. (Don't ask me how I know this! :D )

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You might also want to adhere your papered templates to the walls before decorating them.

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1 hour ago, KathieB said:

Templates can be made from thin cardboard--think file folders. I suppose just about anything can be glued on them. They can be attached to the wall with double-stick tape if you want them to be removable to get to wiring or for redecorating. They can also be glued to the wall. 

They might be a bit more problematic used on a ceiling. Gravity is not your friend. If you are painting the ceilings, glue the plaster embellishments to the painted surface with something like E-6000 jeweler's glue. If you are papering the ceiling, adhere the paper and let dry thoroughly, then use the E-6000 to glue on the plaster bits. E-6000 is not water soluble, so it will not soak into the paper and loosen the wallpaper paste or other water-based adhesives.

Use tissue paper or printer paper to make patterns for the templates, then use the pattern to cut the card stock to size. Be sure to mark which side of the pattern/template goes against the wall. It's easy to accidentally reverse the piece. (Don't ask me how I know this! :D )

Thanks so much  for answering KathieB, but how does the thin cardboard go when painted and when it  has the timber pieces glued to it when doing panelling above and below the dado board? How would it hold all this,  especially the paint?

Edited by Beesy

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On ‎3‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎39‎:‎11‎, Mini maniac said:

You can always make templates of floors, ceilings and walls.  I use cardstock or index cards to do this.  It is harder once put together but templates always help me.  Hope this helps.

Thanks Terry, but what is 'cardstock' please? How would it go with all the paint on it and then the thin boards stuck to that for the panelling and dado boards? Would cardboard hold all that stuff?

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For cardstock I use acid-free posterboard, which is lightweight and sturdy.  When I built my Glencroft pub I made my "bricks" from bits of sandpaper colored with chalk pastels and I made templates of the infill for the first floor and glued the "bricks" to it, then glued the templates to the sections of the lower exterior wall where they went, having first laid the "timbering" pieces over the primed walls and traced around them.  Once I had installed the infill I glued the stained timbering over them onto the walls:

The sun changed the roof's color

Here are the gruesome details of how I did it:  http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=248http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=250 and http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=251  Probably more than you wanted to know, but basically you're playing with paper/ card, scissors/ knife and paste/ glue and having loads of fun for a nice finished product.

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2 hours ago, Beesy said:

Thanks so much  for answering KathieB, but how does the thin cardboard go when painted and when it  has the timber pieces glued to it when doing panelling above and below the dado board? How would it hold all this,  especially the paint?

If the wall finish will be a combination of paneling and paint (or even wallpaper), there may be no need to make a template. Make a template for the papered part, and glue the paneling right to the house wall if the wall will be too difficult to reach when the room is glued together. 

Templates are helpful for hard-to reach places and to cover rough wall surface. They are not the answer to every surface in the house. Keep it simple. :) 

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For me personally, templates are an unnecessary extra time consuming step. Just put the paper directly on the wall. Put the flooring on the floor. You’ll get the hang of it.

edit: like Kathie said.

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The pub's exterior brickwork is the only time I ever used templates.  Because I use premixed wallpaper paste from the hardware store, shenever I want to replace the wallpaper I simply press a damp rag on it and then peel or scrape it off.

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10 hours ago, Beesy said:

Hi Clove, yes it is lovely house. When I get further on with it I will find out how to post the pictures of my work for you to see but will be a while,  as I am very much a learner  at this stage and learning as I go but find all these comments so very helpful. It is marvellous really. I am decorating it in the Georgian era which was very elaborate with lots of moulding on the walls and ceilings and with  fancy plaster work on ceilings, over doors and fireplaces and on walls,  so very decorative and I hope I can do it justice.

It sounds like its going to be lovely! Learning is apart of the fun, :) Look forward to see what you do with it!

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23 hours ago, Beesy said:

Thanks Terry, but what is 'cardstock' please? How would it go with all the paint on it and then the thin boards stuck to that for the panelling and dado boards? Would cardboard hold all that stuff?

Cardstock (cardboard or poster board) can come in different thicknesses.  I use a medium weight cardstock with a thickness of appox 1/8th of an inch.  Once you paint and add to it ....it becomes heavier and stronger. I use it a lot and have never had any issues.  I am actually using corrugated cardboard right now for a porch roof.  I use cardstock to make tiles, wainscoting, shiplap walls....the list goes on and on. I save any packaging material I get.....I even save cereal boxes.    

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On ‎15‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎12‎:‎47‎:‎12‎, KathieB said:

If the wall finish will be a combination of paneling and paint (or even wallpaper), there may be no need to make a template. Make a template for the papered part, and glue the paneling right to the house wall if the wall will be too difficult to reach when the room is glued together. 

Templates are helpful for hard-to reach places and to cover rough wall surface. They are not the answer to every surface in the house. Keep it simple. :) 

Thanks KathieB for the info. The trouble is I have unfortunately already glued the whole house together and yes, it is really terribly hard to get to places like the back walls and the back of the side walls and I do want to paint the template so will just go ahead and try it out and see how it goes. Learning so much.

Edited by Beesy

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On ‎15‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎9‎:‎54‎:‎46‎, Mini maniac said:

Cardstock (cardboard or poster board) can come in different thicknesses.  I use a medium weight cardstock with a thickness of appox 1/8th of an inch.  Once you paint and add to it ....it becomes heavier and stronger. I use it a lot and have never had any issues.  I am actually using corrugated cardboard right now for a porch roof.  I use cardstock to make tiles, wainscoting, shiplap walls....the list goes on and on. I save any packaging material I get.....I even save cereal boxes.    

Cardboard. Yes I know that so will try it out. Thanks again.

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On ‎14‎/‎08‎/‎2018‎ ‎11‎:‎13‎:‎20‎, havanaholly said:

For cardstock I use acid-free posterboard, which is lightweight and sturdy.  When I built my Glencroft pub I made my "bricks" from bits of sandpaper colored with chalk pastels and I made templates of the infill for the first floor and glued the "bricks" to it, then glued the templates to the sections of the lower exterior wall where they went, having first laid the "timbering" pieces over the primed walls and traced around them.  Once I had installed the infill I glued the stained timbering over them onto the walls:

The sun changed the roof's color

Here are the gruesome details of how I did it:  http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=248http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=250 and http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/?app=blog&module=blogs&controller=entry&id=251  Probably more than you wanted to know, but basically you're playing with paper/ card, scissors/ knife and paste/ glue and having loads of fun for a nice finished product.

Amazing house Holly, and also amazing how you built it and finished it all off. Thanks for sharing.

Edited by Beesy

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