Shingles on hinged roof

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Can anyone point me in the direction of close-up pictures of a shingled hinged roof? I tried searching the forum but didn't find what I'm looking for. I want to see what the shingles look like where the two roof pieces meet. I'm shingling a roof with diamond shaped shingles and it looks weird since they can't overlap over the seam. I'm curious if people use trim, or how you do this to make it look okay. (It's only occurring to me now that it would be less obvious with square shingles... too late!)

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I made lozenge-shaped sandpaper shingles for the Orchid general store and cut them flat along the ridge line.

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A custom house I built had to have a removable cap piece placed over the apex of the roof so I could open the roof. Trust me I tried to make it work without it but geometry got in the way. 

I’ll see if I can attach a photo.

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Here's what I'm talking about. I got all the way up to the seam and was going to do the next row with the points just at the bottom of the top piece, but it looks funny.

 

 

IMG_0512.jpg

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Not sure if this is something you might be able to use.  But, how about making a removable ridge cap.  It could be Velcroed to the ridge when the roof is down and removed when you want to open it.  When the roof is closed it would cover up the hinges and the edge of the shingles.

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14 hours ago, fov said:

Here's what I'm talking about. I got all the way up to the seam and was going to do the next row with the points just at the bottom of the top piece, but it looks funny.

 

 

IMG_0512.jpg

.

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I have two roofs with the same issue. Mine do not look perfect at all. One thing I did do was paint the hinges the same color as the shingle to minimize their appearance. You will probably always see the gap.

20180901_102818 (1).jpg

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45 minutes ago, eskava said:

I have two roofs with the same issue. Mine do not look perfect at all. One thing I did do was paint the hinges the same color as the shingle to minimize their appearance. You will probably always see the gap.

20180901_102818 (1).jpg

When you open the roof it doesn’t damage the tiles along the seam? You did a great job along the seam, by the way.

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Oh, thank you. It doesn't get damaged. I ended the shingles at the lower part of the hinged roof, and started a new row at the upper part of the roof. There is no overlap of the shingles when you look from the side.

20180901_115333.jpg

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ok, so lets see if I can explain this to make sense....so what if you attached 1/3 of them to end on the cut and still overlap the row of shingles and add the piece that would normally be still attached to the the roof above the cut line? sorry the pic is so horrible - but basically cut the shingle in half or third and place the "top" piece above the cut line - this way the pattern would continue with minimal disruption....hope that helps 

IMG_6893.jpg

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I can't get a picture of it right now, but the Front Opening Shoppe I bought on Craigslist that's partially finished has a hinged roof, and the person who built it applied the shingles (and everything else, including window frames and a staircase, but that's another frustrating story) without painting or staining anything first. It looks almost exactly like Diane's picture. The octagonal shingles come up to where the hinges are, then the bottoms of the shingles just brush the top edges of the hinges and go on up to the top. You can see the center of the hinges, but the flat parts that secure them are covered by the shingles, and the shingles in that line overlap the same amount as all the other shingles, so it's barely noticeable. My guess is that whoever made it planned the shingling so it would work out that way. 

Taking a close look at the work, which is so well done, is making me rethink my original plan to get rid of the shingles and thatch the roof. Maybe I'll try to paint them to make them look like slate...

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Thanks for the replies. Diane, your shingles look great! I intended to do it exactly like that, but I didn't anticipate how much harder it would be with the hex shingles. Next time I do this I'll use the square ones.

Sable - I was also worried about the roof not opening all the way. I think I can get away with a couple of rows of shingles and it will still open (it might not lie flat, but it will open almost completely).

Colleen - I hadn't even considered that, and it's a good idea! (Maybe that's what Sable meant by a removable ridge cap, too? I wasn't seeing it at first.) I'm not sure if I want a removable piece but if I can't figure anything else out that might be the way to go.

Susie - I understand what you're saying, and that was my original plan, but the spacing didn't work out. I would need to add another row with the bottom piece being very small (basically just the point) and it's getting too bulky -- the roof still opens okay right now, but I think if I add another row it will get in the way. But I also think this is the most likely way to look nice.

So... I just removed my top row of shingles (I thought it would be hard, but they popped right off with a razor blade) and I'm going to redo that row with smaller pieces in hopes that the spacing will be better over the seam. The spacing was kind of off in the middle already so I think it'll look okay, or at least no worse than some of the odd spacing in my other rows. (Straight lines aren't my forte!) I'll post a picture if I'm able to pull it off.

MaryKate - if you're able to take a picture at some point I'd love to see it. Sounds like the builder did a good job.

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well seeing everyones suggestions is certainly inspiring...I know I'm going to run into this dilemma so I'm anxious to see how this turns out for you.

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I still have a few rows to go before it's finished, but here's how it looks over the seam.

This is after I popped off the top row and replaced them with shorter pieces. I did the row below the seam and above the seam at the same time so the pieces would match up.

seam01.jpg

 

 

Here it is with a few more rows above the seam row:

seam03.jpg

 

The shingles do bump, preventing the roof from lying flat, but it opens enough for room access:

seam04.jpg

 

If you stand back from it and look from a distance, the seam isn't that obvious. Ironically it might show up more in the pictures than it does in person. (It also depends on the angle you view it from, it's more obvious from some angles than others.)

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wooohooo! its virtually un-noticable! And I thin you're working on your Queen Anne!  That's the very same dilemma I'll have so I'm glad this worked!!!! Congrats! what a great feeling of accomplishment!

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It looks great Emily:clap:. I think the way the roof opens is perfectly acceptable and when it’s closed it’s perfection!

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On 9/2/2018, 3:30:21, fov said:

seam03.jpg

 

If you wouldn't mind, would you be up for posting a few more photos of how you designed this hinged wall (visible right below the roofline) on this side?  I'm designing my own colonial-style house for my daughters and am contemplating a couple of hinged panels on the front and I really like what I see in this image.  Any more info would be helpful.  

How thick are these exterior walls?  

Thank you! 

Edited by Jake

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It's a 1:24 scale house, so the wood size isn't going to help with your 1:12 plans, but this is 1/4" plywood. Here are some pictures of the shell that include views of the panels: http://www.emilymorganti.com/blog/?p=4984

Finished pics:

rowhouse-almost-finished2.jpg

bay-window.jpg

 

And here's a post explaining some issues I had with countersinking the hinges. In retrospect I wished I had hinged on top of the siding and then covered the hinges with the trim, rather than trying to countersink them. http://www.emilymorganti.com/blog/?p=6161

If you have other questions or want to see it from another view feel free to send me a private message.

 

 

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Your roof came out great! I did forget that my roof does not open flush, but I have a piece of dowel that I use to keep it open to view the room. I have another house done the same way, but using asphalt roofing material. The material  is thinner, and that roof opens all the way.

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wow wow wow! The roof looks amazing! Hope I can make my house look as great as yours!

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