Decoration of front closing house

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So, I was going to build the wall out around the windows a little in the upstairs part of my Apothecary.  This would make it more authentic to show the thickness of the walls etc.  I found it in The Big Book of a Miniature House.  Thankfully I realised that I couldn't do that as I have to attach the hinges and the front wouldn't close if I had done it that way.  A shame because I really liked that idea!  So now I'm just going to do the flat panelling on the front.  My concern is that I'm going to have to leave a cm each side free of skirting, cornice etc otherwise the front won't close properly.  How do people normally get around this?  Surely it'll look odd??

large.IMG_20180917_160337-Optimized.jpg.

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Just leave the gap, you don't really have a choice. It's not any stranger than the front of a building swinging open, is it? :)

 

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I would measure where the abutting wall stops interfering with where the wall closes and do the thickening treatment for the windows to where your baseboard and cornicce end, and treat that last bit of interior wall as the part of the adjacent wall it becomes when the front of the house is closed.

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3 hours ago, havanaholly said:

I would measure where the abutting wall stops interfering with where the wall closes and do the thickening treatment for the windows to where your baseboard and cornicce end, and treat that last bit of interior wall as the part of the adjacent wall it becomes when the front of the house is closed.

Now that's an interesting idea.....

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47 minutes ago, Shareb said:

Now that's an interesting idea.....

It's by golly the way I'd do it.  One of the purposes of those deep set windows was that there are doors on each side of the window that hold the bifold shutters, so whenever the family wanted privacy when the lamps were lit they wold open those casement doors and unfold the shutters and cover the windows.

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I was really set on doing it - it'll be a little more difficult in order to get it perfect, but yes I totally agree.  Okay then!!  Thanks Holly - I shall do exactly that! :D 

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You rock, Rebecca!  Take a page from Mike and use matboard.

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I bought one of those matt board cutters that Mike suggested....I'm hoping it turns up sooner rather than later!  But it is coming from the US.  I don't think I can wait though....I'm off out to my craft cottage now!  :D 

 

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Now that's what I'm talkin 'bout!  :D  What do you think Holly?  Now I've just got to figure out the decorative bits.....large.IMG_20180918_153411-Optimized.jpg.

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I think it looks great awesome collaboration you two.

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Wonderful article thank you Holly!!

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Yay - my mount board cutter has turned up!!!  PERFECT TIMING!

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Rebecca, I was touring a museum in Strasbourg, France this morning and saw an old cabinet house from the late 1600’s with a living quarters upstairs from a workshop. I immediately thought of you and your gentleman’s living quarters. I took photos of it but won’t be able to post them here. Can you please message me your email address and I’ll forward them to you. Have you researched the ceramic heaters that were very commonly used during that time period? I’ve seen them everywhere here just 300km or 500 miles east of Paris. They were used in large chateaus and in small rooms. I’ll find some examples and post the links.

http://antiquefrenchstove.com/Antique%20French%20Stove%20Co%20Just%20In.htm

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The stoves are magnificent!

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This is a photo of the ceramic heater in the cabinet house. Unlike the stoves in my previous link the ones from the 1600’s were very ornate. The outer shell is made completely from individual ceramic tiles.  Most of them were a lovely green. 

D1576AFD-B16F-4213-A043-36A49F8B0C09.jpeg

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This is a real life ceramic tile heater. The wood would be placed through an iron door at the bottom right. A vent would take the gases through the walls to the outside. The green glazed tiles were stunning and very ornate.  This heater is located in the Château du Haut-Koenigsbourg in Alsace, France.

A0FDF208-C5DF-42CC-A0C3-F522A174F60D.jpeg

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Beautiful!

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Somehow it's hard to visualize a humble apothecary having one of those stoves!  Those truly belong in chateaux!

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The apothecary in this case does not seem to be particularly humble. I can easily see one of the stoves from the link in the shop; not nearly as elaborate as the one in Château du Haut-Koenigsbourg yet very handsome, indeed.

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2 hours ago, Sable said:

This is a photo of the ceramic heater in the cabinet house. Unlike the stoves in my previous link the ones from the 1600’s were very ornate. The outer shell is made completely from individual ceramic tiles.  Most of them were a lovely green. 

D1576AFD-B16F-4213-A043-36A49F8B0C09.jpeg

This one was in a silversmith’s living quarters.

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1 hour ago, Sable said:

This one was in a silversmith’s living quarters.

I am intrigued by the cupboard at left with the symbols on it.

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1 hour ago, KathieB said:

I am intrigued by the cupboard at left with the symbols on it.

Kathy, actually it is a doorway to the adjoining room.  I can send you a photo of the entire room if you pm your email address to me. 

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The palace that is close to my house has a ton of these heaters and they’re all besutiful. They are also, of course, all Danish blue.

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