Dressing a Gent

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I have bought Sherri's 'Fred' mini doll kit to turn into Master Raymond.  I chose him with a basic dress shoe.  Master Raymond has stockings and his shoes have a large tongue and buckle.  Am I best to paint the molded dress shoes and add a tongue (and buckle) later?  Can I use polymer clay to create the tongue and somehow glue it on to the resin before painting?  Or am I best to igore the molded shoes completely and make shoes from scratch?  I've started a topic for this as I have no doubt that I'm going to need your help as I go through the costuming process with him!!

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You could make the buckles from metallic polymer clay and scrap bits of fabric or glove leather for the tongues painted to match the shoes and glue them on.

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Thanks for that Holly.  I bought metal buckles from Sherri when I bought the doll kit.  Wonderful Sherri has come to my aid about the shoes!  She's given me fantastic instructions so I may (or may not) get around to looking at that tomorrow.

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What sort of materials are the best to use for dressing miniature dolls??

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Natural fabrics: cotton, silk, thin wool/ gabardine, fine linen.  Glove leather for shoes (if they aren't molded).

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I'm going to have to paint the symbols onto his coat.  I was looking at some sort of fabric 'pen' however given that I'm going to have to create the right colours I think I'll have to go with paint pots and brushes.  Are there any paints that seem to work better than others?  The fabric is relatively dark so they'll need to be relatively bright without being 'modern'.

 

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What about first painting the symbols in white fabric paint, then laying your colors over the white?

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I just took a look at Master Raymond's coat.  That is very intricate.  Would you consider printing on fabric with a color printer (assuming you have one)?  You might have to end up printing the 1:12 equivalent of those cut and sew doll clothes printed panels, but it would give you a very accurate version of his coat once complete.

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See if you can find a Jacquard ribbon that is embroidered...about 3inches wide. It may not be exact, but it will close?

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Necktie in an appropriately busy little design?

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Nope - it's such an iconic piece of clothing I have to try and do it somewhat accurately.  I've bought a heap of different coloured cotton in fat quarters from Spoonflower - hard to get the shade correct when it looks slightly different in every picture!!  I also bought some good quality fabric paint from Amazon.  Won't get either until towards the end of the month so meantime I'll do some research and practise.

On ‎5‎/‎02‎/‎2019‎ ‎1‎:‎37‎:‎31‎, Debsrand56 said:

I just took a look at Master Raymond's coat.  That is very intricate.  Would you consider printing on fabric with a color printer (assuming you have one)?  You might have to end up printing the 1:12 equivalent of those cut and sew doll clothes printed panels, but it would give you a very accurate version of his coat once complete.

I do like the idea of printing on fabric - I have no idea how so I'll have to look into it.  Can any fabric be printed on?  Alternatively I guess I could print onto transfer paper and iron the patterns on.  As I say - research and practise!!  I reckon this would be cleaner and yes, more accurate than if I simply tried to paint.  Apparently they are based on illnesses of the time and the herbs used at that time to treat them.

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5 hours ago, Shareb said:

I do like the idea of printing on fabric - I have no idea how so I'll have to look into it.  Can any fabric be printed on? 

A natural fiber fabric .. cotton, linen, silk ... works best. Cut a piece of freezer paper to the exact size accepted by your printer. Iron a piece of fabric onto the plastic-coated side. Carefully trim the overhang. It will run through your printer just fine.  The backing paper will peel off easily. If it is an inkjet printer, keep in mind that the color is not waterproof. (Found that out when I sprayed a printed blanket with a water-based hair spray. Live and learn! :D )

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21 minutes ago, KathieB said:

A natural fiber fabric .. cotton, linen, silk ... works best. Cut a piece of freezer paper to the exact size accepted by your printer. Iron a piece of fabric onto the plastic-coated side. Carefully trim the overhang. It will run through your printer just fine.  The backing paper will peel off easily. If it is an inkjet printer, keep in mind that the color is not waterproof. (Found that out when I sprayed a printed blanket with a water-based hair spray. Live and learn! :D )

Wow what a great tip!

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6 hours ago, Shareb said:

I do like the idea of printing on fabric - I have no idea how so I'll have to look into it.  Can any fabric be printed on? 

What Kathie said.  :-)  Also, if you have a local fabric/craft store, they may sell printable fabric sheets already pre-backed and pre-treated to help make them colorfast.  Quilters use them to put photos in quilts.

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I have to figure out what our equivalent of freezer paper is - I'm thinking it's probably our 'greaseproof' paper which has a waxy surface on one side.  I've had a look at a couple of youtube vids of it being done so I'll have a play around.  It has to be on medium dark cotton and be bright enough to stand out and look like embroidery.  I'll have a play around with the images and see how I can get them to look good.  Otherwise I could do the transfer with Mod Podge....or iron on.  But I'm certainly going to have fun trying to print on material!!  This is why I LOVE miniatures!  So many different techniques and crafts can be used - you never really get bored! (Except when panelling a heap of walls.....)

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Rebecca  freezer paper and grease proof is not the same, I use freezer paper in my quilting, it irons on to a fabric so it makes goos templates but gresaeproof does not work. Try a quilting shop or an Amazon. If you get rrally stuck I can mail you some XX Jeannine

 

just checked Auatralia/New Zealand  amazon has it . It is Reynolds Freezer paper ,the kind i use it is lightly plastic coated but just barely, thid is what you need

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56 minutes ago, Thimble Hall said:

Rebecca  freezer paper and grease proof is not the same, I use freezer paper in my quilting, it irons on to a fabric so it makes goos templates but gresaeproof does not work. Try a quilting shop or an Amazon. If you get rrally stuck I can mail you some XX Jeannine

Thanks Jeannine!  I'm glad you said that as I was going to try with the wax paper tomorrow!  My Spoonflower order was sent today so I'd best go order some freezer paper too!

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Perfect - found some Reynolds - NZ$88 but it's a decent sized roll and is coming from the UK.  Thank you so much again Jeannine!!

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