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Books?

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Posted (edited)

Working on some miniature books. I wanted ones I could actually read, or at least look at the pictures, so I started with an art book of one of my favorite artists, John Flaxman (1755-1826), based on the illustrations he did for the Iliad and Odyssey. Piranesi did the etchings based on his drawings and they were offered for sale in many forms. Below is a start I have made on setting up the pages. All the art being close to 200 years old at this point is copyright free. I have covers and end papers etc. also.

Just wondering how you make books? After I do a few of these (one for my library and a few to give away) I was going to do a eight volume set of the Iliad and Odyssey if I can get the print small enough to work correctly

 

** Warning ** This is neoclassical art so there is some minor nudity involved if you expand the pictures. I don't want to offend anyone. It isn't blatant but it is there ** Warning **

Flaxman_Pages.jpg

Edited by Miniatures in Marble
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38 minutes ago, Miniatures in Marble said:

...Just wondering how you make books?...

I suppose it depends on who is going to make them.  Will there be printing on both sides of the page?   I have seen DIY mini books where the strips of pages, being printed only on one side, were set up to be accordion folded (and I suppose the blank backs then glued together, which makes for incredibly out-of-scale thick pages).  If on both sides (good luck!) I suppose you'd set them up to print folio style, with four pages on both sides to be folded into quartos and cut apart for binding (why many really old books had to have the outer parts of their pages cut apart).

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I print 1:12 books in 3-point Garamond (I've found that that type face looks the cleanest to me when it's tiny).  I usually end up doing a synopsis of the book, rather than the whole text, because I can't really fit the whole thing.  I have set up a template that allows me to print double-sided.  I keep the pages numbered underneath so that I can keep track of the order, because the order is kind of crazy if you want everything in the right order once you cut and fold.  I outline my pages with a gold color.  That way, when I cut them apart, if any gold shows, it just looks like gold-edged pages.  :)  

I use this tutorial for making the books themselves:   http://jamesdarrow.deviantart.com/art/Micro-Book-Tutorial-135409683   (Hope it's still there; the link is blocked at work, so I can't test it.)  I have found that works the best for me.  It's pretty easy to follow.  Oh, and I use my printer's "best" setting, to get things as clear as I possibly can in miniature.

Hope this helps, and good luck!

 

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I figured one or more members would have done the mini book thing!  In my misspent youth I worked in binderies, and watching the printers set up the presses for books was fascinating.

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So I set up the pages and covers and end papers and had office max print (they have a better printer) enough to make five books. Anyway I figure to waste one learning with it and keep two so if anyone wants one of the others they are freebies. Just review them for me and tell me how to improve

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Hi Joel. :wave: Great project. Will you consider doing a tutorial -- a series of photos of the various steps in the process -- in an album ? You have enough posts to open a gallery now.

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Yes I will once done

Here are a few "action" shots. The cover is on 110lb cardstock the pages are on 24lb resume cotton paper. This is an "art" book so the pages would be heavier than normal. I did double sided print even though only one side will have pictures which was normal for the time period for illustrated books. But the second side has some detailing as can be seen. The marbled end papers are on cotton paper as well. I have started cutting out the individual pages but that will take a while plus keeping them in order. There are 34 illustrations in each series plus two title pages and a few blanks mixed in so about 74 pages all together. I also need to cover up the white edges

You can actually read "The Iliad and The Odyssey by John Flaxman" fairly well on the cover along with "Engraved by Giovanni Piranesi". I haven't had so much fun with a little project in a while :)

Book 01.jpg

Book 02.jpg

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Love it. Love it, love it, love it. Great idea and beautifully executed.

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Wow! Gorgeous! 

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Good start! I love the marble paper on the inside cover.

I can't tell from the picture, are you printing them at 300 dpi? That will help ensure that the text is crisp enough to read.

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I had them printed at Office Max as my printer isn't good enough for this. The paper is far too think I need something thinner like bible paper if I want to do books. This is fine for an "art" book of pictures but not for printed material

I noticed cash register receipt paper (like from the supermarket) is really thin also so maybe something along those lines

Anyway attached are pics from the test one I did. Didn't come out all that well but I learned a lot from it and the next ones will be better. This is just before final assembly

thumbnail (1).jpg

thumbnail.jpg

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Posted (edited)

And completed - my phone camera just doesn't do good enough close-ups

thumbnail (2).jpg

thumbnail (3).jpg

Edited by Miniatures in Marble
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Joel, we learn by doing, and your "failures" will look great in a bookcase!  (My failed experiments should look as good!)

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That's how I learn the most - by just doing it.

Here's what I need to fix from the first one:

1. The glue wasn't fully dry when I sanded and some of the paper didn't sand cleanly. Easy fix just let it dry thoroughly between each step and not be so impatient

2. The cover looks like the print is wearing off at the folds. I am thinking some sort of protective clear spray or paint might help not sure what to try so any suggestions would help

3. The cover looks good but is flat. I'd like to add some texture to selected areas of the spine. Maybe an embossing powder??

4. The pages look a little loose the glue at the spine didn't penetrate enough to hold them. They work but repeated handling would cause them to eventually fall out. I used Aleene's Tacky Glue maybe there is a stronger alternative that penetrates better. Maybe a liquid Super Glue? Something to soak in a little. I could also resort to sewing the pages but that is the last resort

5. Definitely need thinner paper if I want to do printed pages. I have about 40 pages of 25lb resume paper in this one will need something a lot thinner if I want to get up to 100+ pages

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9 minutes ago, Miniatures in Marble said:

...2. The cover looks like the print is wearing off at the folds. I am thinking some sort of protective clear spray or paint might help not sure what to try so any suggestions would help...

...4....I could also resort to sewing the pages...

2.  Try the art sealers from art supply stores, such as used to "fix" pastels.

4.  Sewing the folios for binding is an old bindery technique.  I think the glue used nowadays is a synthetic version of the old cowhide glue.

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4. If the glue penetrates farther into the page, will it affect how far the book can be opened? What about trying the glue that is used to edge blocks of paper? Pad/Book Glue

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4 hours ago, Miniatures in Marble said:

5. Definitely need thinner paper if I want to do printed pages. I have about 40 pages of 25lb resume paper in this one will need something a lot thinner if I want to get up to 100+ pages

You want to make sure that whatever you choose won't jam the printer.  HP makes a 16 lb. paper; you could give that a try.  100+ pages is a lot for a miniature book.

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If your scale is 1:12 you will want to measure the thickness of 100+ pages and divide it by 12 to get a book whose thickness is in that scale.  I can't think of any paper thin enough to work 100+ pages.

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100 pages would be pushing it but mid 90’s should be doable based on the first test. The rest are fantastic ideas I will be following up on. I learned so much doing the first one and this board is great for asking for help

 

 

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IMO the whole point of a creative hobby is to see how to make your vision a reality.

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19 minutes ago, havanaholly said:

IMO the whole point of a creative hobby is to see how to make your vision a reality.

And that often involves the use of smoke and mirrors. :) 

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Odd I posted an update but I don't see it anyway round 2 second test

I used gloss gel medium to add some texture and protect the cover seems to work well. I am going to try selectively painting ridges on the raised area of the spine, let it dry, then put a thin coat over everything and I think I will have it

The pad/book compound worked well. The pages seem to be staying put on this one

Working on slipcovers. Once sanded down on the edges (which it isn't here) I think they will look good

So I seem to have resolved the main issues and not discovered any major new ones. I need to find some tiny silk ribbon (1mm wide?) for the bookmark and then put it all together and I think I will have something to work with. Seeing how well the illustrations show I am going to try some art books with different paintings as pages and some other ideas like that

BTW the book measures 11/16 by 15/16 overall so a little large

 

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9531D74F-358E-4122-AA7D-3A8F115972FA.jpeg

 

 

Edited by Miniatures in Marble
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Nice!  I have seen some people put thread or crochet thread under the spine to create the raised ridges you're looking for.  For ribbons, try here:   https://www.etsy.com/listing/178992688/ribbon-by-the-yard-16mm-to-2mm-narrow?ref=shop_home_active_4   or here:   https://www.bluebellminiatures.co.uk/product_list.asp?p_subcategory=SR02   (I've never ordered from this one, but it's in the UK, which I think you are, too).  2mm ribbon should work fine for bookmarks.

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Thanks I am in the US

trying to find 1mm I want the ribbon type of bound in bookmark

 

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58 minutes ago, jaxenro said:

trying to find 1mm I want the ribbon type of bound in bookmark

You're best bet is probably to look on Etsy.  I saw this:   https://www.etsy.com/listing/244886850/1-mm-smooth-silk-ribbon-ornament?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=silk+ribbon+1mm&ref=sr_gallery-1-3&pro=1&frs=1&col=1  and this:  https://www.etsy.com/listing/244885032/1-mm-batik-silk-ribbon-embroidery?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=silk+ribbon+1mm&ref=sr_gallery-1-6&pro=1&frs=1&col=1   I see they are both coming from Turkey, but they ship to the U.S.  The smallest I have been able to find with U.S suppliers is 2 mm.  Another option is to unravel bunka and straighten it out.  (I use a little water or Fray Check to smooth it out.  The Fray Check also helps keep its edges smoother as well).  In the picture below, the "ribbon" on the 1:12 scale box of chocolate is actually unraveled bunka.

Chocolates.jpg.18a9fb815a94d80f397526671

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