Making Arched Windows?

8 posts in this topic

Does anyone know how to make arched windows? See pics of this house:

I found the windows I believe my mother intended to use for the dormers, but I have no idea how to do those windows on the ground floor. I can do the sandstone surrounds, that's not my problem. It's the curved sashes inside the frame - the actual windows - that I'm stumped on. Help?

I know it seems like I'm bouncing from one house to the other. I'm really not! I've sorted out most of my stuff and all the things I inherited from my mother. Now I'm just trying to prioritize.  Not counting the room boxes, I have 34 dollhouses I'll never finish. THIRTY-FOUR!! That's nuts.

Anyway, this is one I'd like to complete and keep (eventually!). Mom had the shell custom made for the Avery House in my hometown of Fort Collins, CO.

Aaannnd you know me and historical tidbits, can't skip those, lol. Even if you've never been to Fort Collins, you have kinda-sorta visited my hometown if you've ever been to Disneyland.

Fort Collins Influenced Main Street USA, Disneyland

The Disneyland / Fort Collins Connection

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a book that outlines the construction of arched / paladin windows, I will take pics when I get home for you.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, dooder85 said:

I have a book that outlines the construction of arched / paladin windows, I will take pics when I get home for you.

 

That would be awesome, thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been successful with bending the wood trim to form a curve. 

Take a piece of trim and soak it in water for an hour. Starting with a glass jar slowly bend the wood around the jar and use many rubber bands to hold it in place. Let it dry for at least 24 hours. Depending on the thickness of the wood you might have to start with a larger jar and repeat the steps using smaller jars until the curve is your desired shape.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sable said:

I’ve been successful with bending the wood trim to form a curve. 

Take a piece of trim and soak it in water for an hour. Starting with a glass jar slowly bend the wood around the jar and use many rubber bands to hold it in place. Let it dry for at least 24 hours. Depending on the thickness of the wood you might have to start with a larger jar and repeat the steps using smaller jars until the curve is your desired shape.

Thank you, I'll take all the help I can get. I should explain the reason I'm asking about issues I'm having with several different houses is that those potential obstacles are things that might make me decide to not complete them, if those obstacles prove to be insurmountable (by my limited skills at any rate).

I've recently asked for help on closing off the basement for my mom's childhood home, how to alter my Francisca Hinojos dollhouse to be front-opening, and a host of questions re: my Dutch Gambrel and French Quarter houses! Those last two are the ones actually sitting on my work tables and getting worked on. The help so many members have offered has been invaluable to me. It is a great help in prioritizing and knowing how to proceed on various dollhouses, or if I even want to try!

Anyway, back to this one. Here is a close-up showing the sashes are curved inside the window frames, not just made to appear curved by an overlapping trim.

With the parts to this house, I came across a dozen of these, ten of these, and one each of this and this. ARGH! I have no idea what other house she may have been planning to use them on, but with those casings I think it's pretty obvious they won't work on this one. The exterior components anyway. Ugh, I wish that woman had kept a blog, or at least some notes!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might also think about making the curved window trim with mat board. It can be easily cut and then glued in layers to build up thickness. Once sanded, sealed and painted, no one will know it is not wood.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also cut your curved top from 1/8" basswood with a sharp utility knife and layer to your desired thickness.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now