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Step-by-Step Directions for first time builders?


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#1 debramt

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 09:10 PM

Thanks to all of you, Terry and I made the decision to go forward with the GL Laser Cut Beaumont (our first dollhouse project). I've learned much from all the forum comments and suggestions, but wondered if there's a step-by-step guide, Youtube video or reference, that explains each sequential step for building a dollhouse (based on all your best practices and lessons learned), for example:
  • Open your new box and locate all the house components and label each by....,
  • Read the instructions several times so you're comfortable with the building plan,
  • Dry fit the house (using painter's tape) to ensure all parts fit together properly
  • Once built (dry fit) begin thinking about your interior design plans, i.e., paint color, wall coverings, lighting, furniture arrangements, etc.
  • and so on....
All of this may be included in the dollhouse instructions box, but not having build a dollhouse, we aren't sure.

Thanks again everyone.... we're pumped!

Debbie

#2 mininecessities

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:20 PM

I am not real experienced but I would say your steps 1-5 are great! and it is good that you are asking questions. My Garfield directions just had me build the house, yes step by step BUT did not that I can recall suggest finishing off hard to get to areas, or doing the ceilings floors and wall coverings FIRST! So I ended up working two days to wallpaper the 2nd floor staircase............barely able to get my hand in there let alone move it around much lol...........it was quite a lesson. But then too I was over anxious, but it was the first kit I assembled from scatch.......my Laurel was prior built by its previous owner so I just took it apart and used different glue. My first house , all the rooms were pretty easy to get to. Congrats on your decision.....that is sometimes the hardest step.........deciding! have fun and hope to see pics as you roll along!

Thanks to all of you, Terry and I made the decision to go forward with the GL Laser Cut Beaumont (our first dollhouse project). I've learned much from all the forum comments and suggestions, but wondered if there's a step-by-step guide, Youtube video or reference, that explains each sequential step for building a dollhouse (based on all your best practices and lessons learned), for example:

  • Open your new box and locate all the house components and label each by....,
  • Read the instructions several times so you're comfortable with the building plan,
  • Dry fit the house (using painter's tape) to ensure all parts fit together properly
  • Once built (dry fit) begin thinking about your interior design plans, i.e., paint color, wall coverings, lighting, furniture arrangements, etc.
  • and so on....
All of this may be included in the dollhouse instructions box, but not having build a dollhouse, we aren't sure.

Thanks again everyone.... we're pumped!

Debbie


Currently Working On:
The Garfield by Greenleaf and Scratch built Gypsy Wagon

Still in the boxes: 2 San Franciscans, the Lafayette, and the Ashley

(all by DuraCraft.)

and now the Granville by Arply. Vintage house still in the box!
 

 

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#3 havanaholly

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:28 PM

I'm not aware of a You-Tube video, but I have posted a basic "getting started" list that you can do a search for here, that is basically what you have listed. To summarize:
Open the box, sniff and pet the wood.
Remove the instructions, the schematics sheet, the acetate sheet of window and door inserts, and the Warm-Up sheet; place the acetate inserts between the pages of the Warm-Up wheet, the basic message of the Warm Up sheet is "DON'T PANIC"
Read over the instructions. Place everything back in the box and go fix yourself a cup of hot chocolate, and start listening for the kit's voice.
The next time you open the box, set the Warm Up sheet with the acetate inserts aside, but where you can plainly see it. Read over the instructions again, using the schematics sheet to locate and identify the parts for each step. At this point I arrange all the plywood sheets into numerical order; this makes it easier for me to locate parts as I need them. (I used to remove and label the parts, but it's a whole lot easier for me to leave them in the sheets and use the schematics sheet to locate the parts; I cross them off of the instructions sheet as I put them into place).
At this point it's perfectly OK to put everything back into the box (leave the Warm Up sheet on top) and go have another cup of chocolate or a stiffer drink, perhaps.
Assemble your knife, several new, sharp blades, sanding block and sandpaper (emeryboards OK) and a roll (or two) of masking tape and start building according to the directions, sanding/ shaving your tabs & slots to get a good fit. Do NOT use any glue, this is your "dry fit". This is your opportunity to discover whether the instructions "work" for you as written, or if you need to change the order, or just ignore them altogether (probably not a good idea with the Beaumont); also, you can see what parts will be difficult to access for decoration after the build. I leave the house in dry fit as long as it takes to get it to start talking (although lately I can't shut them up as soon as the kit arrives!).
You might want to wait to install windows and doors and their trims until after the rest of the build and decoration has been done, unless you're a lot steadier of hand than I.
A gluing jig is nice to have for assembling stairs. Toothpicks are nice to have for applying glue.
If the instructions still say to seal the wood with shellac, you don't have do; clear sanding sealer works just as well for wood you aren't planning to stain or prime.
Ask questions, have fun, and enjoy the build.
havanaholly
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#4 debramt

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 08:33 PM

Well, we've received the Beaumont box (it's big!) and set up the table for the build.

A QUESTION REGARDING TAPE: What is the optimal tape to use for the Dry Fit (characteristics offering good adhesive and reside-free). I'm thinking '3M Scotch Painters Blue Tape". What's everyone using for the Dry Fit Process?

#5 KathieB

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 09:01 PM

A QUESTION REGARDING TAPE: What is the optimal tape to use for the Dry Fit (characteristics offering good adhesive and reside-free). I'm thinking '3M Scotch Painters Blue Tape". What's everyone using for the Dry Fit Process?

Masking tape, blue painter's tape, green painter's tape ... whatever's cheapest. It doesn't need to hold forever and won't be on long enough to worry about residue.

#6 havanaholly

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 09:03 PM

What Kathie said.
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#7 debramt

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 09:19 PM

Thanks for the quick response.... I have some painter's tape from a recent project so I can begin assembling in a few days.

#8 jbnmini

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 10:18 AM

LOL I like Holly's step-by-step instructions.... :giggle: Gonna remember them for the next kit.

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#9 debramt

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 05:59 PM

After opening the Beaumont Box, all parts were included except for the Warm Up Sheet. Does anyone have access to the Warm Up Sheet and could scan/ email us a copy?

thanks,

deb

Edited by debramt, 23 December 2011 - 06:00 PM.


#10 havanaholly

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 09:16 PM

You can certainly use one of the slick paper newspaper ad inserts to keep your acetate insert sheets safe from scratching/ damage. The Warm Up sheet gives a basic list of what you need (you can also figure that out from the instructions & the dry fit), and the best info it has is these words I'm giving you right now: Don't panic!
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#11 labrown

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 06:24 AM

When you get started dry-fitting have LOTS of what ever tape you are going to use. I try to keep 2-3 rolls of different widths -- at least when my dogs don't come steal it -- don't know why but they love to grab it if it falls on the floor--and it's not easy trying to pull off a piece with bite marks in the roll. But I do use tons of that stuff all through the building process.

Just have fun with your first one and remember that there is nothing you can't fix even if it means taking apart and starting over. For me it's not a race to the finish, it's the journey along the way,

Lu Ann

#12 havanaholly

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 09:11 AM

Years ago I invested in a self-healing cutting mat and I keep LOTS of waxed paper on hand, and when I need narrow strips of masking tape (like for door & window trim, wanting to glue bare wood to bare wood) I lay strips of tape onto sheets of waxed paper, mark the intervals down both ends for the narrower widths I want, and use my corkbacked steel straight edge and a brand new blade in my utility knife to cut narrower widths of tape. It peels right off of the waxed paper, with just as much stickum as usual.
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#13 fov

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 03:02 PM

You'll find the warm-up sheet here (it's also stickied at the top of the Question about a Particular House / Greenleaf Dollhouses forum). Make sure to click the green Download button to download it; the thumbnail version that displays on that page is too small to read.

I haven't read this lately and am not sure if it applies entirely to laser cut houses (might have instructions about sanding, etc.) But this file should give you the gist of it.

#14 Mandystar

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 11:51 AM

Oh, Debra, what you are experiencing right now is the best part of building a dollhouse!!!

Yeah -- I mean the head-scratching, planning, dry-fitting, "what the heck am I supposed to do now" parts!!! It's just like having a HUGE 3-D jigsaw puzzle where the picture on the box is only a suggestion! Certain steps (like dry fitting each section) are really important, but I'd go along with Holly's recipe in a heart beat!

Lu Ann said it in a nutshell...Enjoy the journey!
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#15 havanaholly

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:08 PM

Do the lasercut kits have a warmup shhet? I don't remember one with my 1:24 Lighthouse...
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#16 SallyG

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 01:19 PM

Ahh..the laser-cut Beaumont!!! Laser cut....ahhh! You are lucky to be doing laser cut and not the die-cut..I'm working on the Fairfield and am back in my old sanding mode...the laser cut Rosedale spoiled me!! The only thing I can add is to know exactly how each room will be painted/papered and decorated. Do as much as possible before you glue the house together, being careful of matching up corners, etc. Plan your flooring also. I generally have 90% of the house interior completed when I finally glue it together!

#17 Mandystar

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 01:41 PM

Hi Sally,

Nice to meet a neighbor! I think the prep work that you are talking about applies to both... laser-cut or dye-cut houses. I'm so pleased with myself that I thought that bit out before starting on my first house -- especially after reading all the horror stories about trying to get in to wallpaper (or whatever) all those impossible-to-get-to places!
<em class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>Still don't know what I want to be when I grow up!</span></em>

#18 SallyG

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 11:37 AM

Hi Sally,

Nice to meet a neighbor! I think the prep work that you are talking about applies to both... laser-cut or dye-cut houses. I'm so pleased with myself that I thought that bit out before starting on my first house -- especially after reading all the horror stories about trying to get in to wallpaper (or whatever) all those impossible-to-get-to places!


Ah, Mandy...Delray! I'm in Lake Worth. I come down to Delray once in a while to the dollhouse shop! I have to make a trip down there soon for some half-scale things! And yes, the prep applies to both. It makes life a LOT easier!

#19 Mandystar

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 12:02 PM

Oh, yes. I've been to that shop so many times! I probably paid their rent for a few months back when I first got started! Let me know when you plan to go next -- don't wait too long because their stock is getting pretty low. You do know that they're closing in March, right?
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#20 havanaholly

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 08:57 PM

Sally & Sandy, I grew up three blocks north of Forest Hill Blvd in West Palm Beach.
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